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Philip Leigh
During the Civil War Sesquicentennial from 2011 to 2015, Philip Leigh wrote 24 articles about the era for the New York Times. Since then he has written six books about the American Civil War and Reconstruction, including “Trading With the Enemy,” “Lee’s Lost Dispatch,” “The Confederacy at Flood Tide,” “U. S. Grant’s Failed Presidency,” and “Southern Reconstruction.” He holds a B. S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Florida Institute of Technology and an MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School.
by | Nov 5, 2019

The Constitution stipulates that impeachment is confined to a president’s high crime or misdemeanor, not his unpopularity. To date, the House Intelligence Committee is showing Americans nothing more than Trump’s unpopularity among Democrats, which most of the press amplifies with…

by | Oct 29, 2019

A decade after the 2008 taxpayer bailout, Americans remained skeptical of banks. According to a 2018 survey, one-third of the public had “hardly any confidence in bank leaders” as compared to 10 percent before the bailout. In reality, the rescue…

by | Oct 25, 2019

Ignored among current reparations discussions is the fact the South has already paid them — if not for slavery, then for losing the Civil War. For at least 25 years after the war, over half of the federal budget was…

by | Oct 18, 2019

Trump critics increasingly compare him to Andrew Johnson, who, in 1868, was the first president to face impeachment. Like Trump, Johnson was easily provoked into unruly speech and considered morally inferior by his opponents, who regarded themselves to be sincere…

by | Oct 8, 2019

Two years after the Civil War ended in 1865, a Republican Congress gained a veto-proof majority in both chambers. They almost immediately began trimming the powers of the executive and judicial branches. First, they replaced President Andrew Johnson’s Reconstruction plan…

by | Aug 29, 2019

Texas novelist William Humphrey revealed how Confederate statues animate the Southern tradition: “If the Civil War is more alive to the Southerner than the Northerner it is because all of the past is, and this is so because the Southerner has a…

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