by | Aug 12, 2019

Last week aging rocker Tommy Lee, who was last relevant in the 1980s as the drummer for the band Mötley Crüe, blew up Twitter with a recitation of an old left-wing screed that had originally appeared on social media and in…

by | Jul 3, 2019

This Independence Day, many of us will be enjoying good food, good company — and maybe even a good book. If you’re looking for something to read over the long weekend, I can think of no better choice than Michael…

by | Jun 21, 2019

On June 15, 1864 the Army of the Potomac established what became the siege of Petersburg, which acted as the gateway to Richmond, Virginia, the capital of the Confederate States of Virginia. Although the city was not enveloped, Gen. Ulysses…

by | Apr 29, 2019

Willoughby Run is a stream too small to be called a creek. Trickling southward through the hills of Adams County, Pennsylvania, it runs between two low ridges and crosses U.S. Highway 30 east of what is now a golf course,…

by | Mar 5, 2019

Hoping for a knockout blow to battered, bedraggled remnants of the Confederate army, the starched and ready ranks of… Hold on. If memory serves, the Civil War wound up at Appomattox Court House, with Lee’s surrender to Grant. Maybe not….

by | Jul 26, 2018

In the summer of 1862, just weeks before the Battle of Sharpsburg (or Antietam) — the bloodiest single day of fighting in American history — Union Captain George Armstrong Custer attended the wedding of Confederate Captain John “Gimlet” Lea at…

by | Mar 16, 2018

In one of his final columns in 2015, my late friend Peter Hannaford wrote about how liberal activists had been trying to remove a statue of William McKinley not far from his home in California. On February 21, 2018, the…

by | Nov 9, 2017

Well, we learned one thing on Election Day: Virginia is for louts. This should not stand. It cannot stand. We have a reform proposal. Don’t know why we didn’t think of it earlier. In 1985, when we moved from our…

by | Sep 21, 2017

T.S. Eliot wrote that “April is the cruellest month…mixing Memory and desire…” But he never spent a sun-drenched, late summer’s day on Antietam Creek where poignant beauty mixes with memory and blood. The battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg (southerners use…

by | Aug 23, 2017

Capitol Hill displays 100 luminaries in Statuary Hall: two donated from every state in the nation. Per The Washington Times, more than 25 of these silent sentinels—Confederate politicians and/or soldiers; others merely slaveholders or segregationists—from a bygone era have come…

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