Richard Kirk

The Audacity of Wishful Thinking

 

In an off-the-teleprompter comment from Springfield, Missouri, the less-than-one-term Illinois Senator, Barack Obama, recently remarked that Americans could save as much fuel as might be obtained from offshore drilling merely by tuning up their cars and keeping tires properly inflated. Since the MSM hasn’t seen fit to accurately publicize this amazing insight, I must insist […]

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Kinder and Gentler

 

Makers and Takers: Why Conservatives Work Harder, Feel Happier, Have Closer Families, Take Fewer Drugs, Give More Generously, Value Honesty More, Are Less Materialistic and Envious, Whine Less…and Even Hug Their Children More Than Liberals by Peter Schweizer (Doubleday, 258 pages, $24.95) “I think that when statesmen forsake their own private conscience for the sake […]

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More Freedom, Less Freakonomics

 

Freedomnomics: Why the Free Market Works and Other Half-Baked Theories Don’t by John Lott (Regnery, 275 pages, $27.95) Freedomnomics is John Lott’s free market retort to the wildly popular book, Freakonomics — that pastiche of thin analysis that skims over topics as diverse as sumo wrestling, real estate rip-offs, used car prices, and children’s names. […]

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Hewitt’s Mitt

 

A Mormon in the White House? by Hugh Hewitt (Regnery Publishing, 311 pages, $27.95) Mitt Romney has a friend in Hugh — Hugh Hewitt that is. The radio talk-show host, Harvard grad, and Ohio sports aficionado has nothing but praise for the former Bay State governor and GOP presidential candidate. And the case for Romney […]

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Darwin, Brooks, and Mass Murder

 

David Brooks’s column on the status of Darwinism in Western culture appeared in my local paper the day after Cho Seung-Hui murdered thirty-two human beings in Blacksburg, Virginia — a record for campus slaughter that surpassed the mark set by Charles Whitman at the University of Texas in 1966. In his piece Brooks touts the […]

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An Exercise in Contempt

 

“Sublimely non-tendentious,” that’s the phrase I’ve always attributed to Alfred North Whitehead — a man who began his career as a Cambridge mathematician collaborating with Bertrand Russell and ended that career as a Harvard philosopher and metaphysician. Two things you can count on when reading Whitehead. First, he will look at the big picture. Second, […]

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Mark Steyn Alone

 

America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It by Mark Steyn. (Regnery, 224 pages, $27.95) Two things set Mark Steyn apart from dystopian naysayers like Paul Ehrlich and Al Gore. First, Steyn is an irrepressible bon vivant — an odd trait in a journalist touting “the end of the world as we […]

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Brain Food

 

Godless: The Church of Liberalism by Ann Coulter (Crown Forum, 310 pages, $27.95) What’s most amazing about Ann Coulter’s book, Godless: The Church of Liberalism, is the amount of intellectual meat she packs into 281 breezy, barb-filled pages. Among the topics the blonde bomb-thrower discusses in some depth are the following: liberal jurisprudence, privacy rights […]

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The Weatherman Aboveground

 

The Professors: The 101 Most Dangerous Academics in America by David Horowitz. (Regnery, $27.95, 448 pages) Slogging through The Professors: The 101 Most Dangerous Academics in America is a bit like taking in the Interstate scenery between Abilene and El Paso — a whole lot of the same thing. Orchestrated by David Horowitz and largely […]

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Dialysis Analysis

 

Disinformation: 22 Media Myths That Undermine the War on Terror by Richard Miniter (Regnery Publishing, 275 pages, $27.95) Anyone who believes that Osama bin Laden is on dialysis, that 100,000 Iraqis have been killed in the recent war, or that Halliburton has reaped huge profits from the Iraq conflict would do well to consult Richard […]

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