Three Observations of Netanyahu's Speech to Congress | The American Spectator | USA News and Politics
Three Observations of Netanyahu’s Speech to Congress
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After nearly six weeks worth of temper tantrums from the Obama Administration and other Democrats because House Speaker John Boehner had the temerity to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to make his case against a nuclear deal with Iran Bibi spoke his peace this morning.

Let me make the following three observations.

First, given the attacks Netanyahu has sustained against his integrity and judgment by the Obama Administration, he has every right to strike back with vengeance. Instead, Netanyahu killed President Obama with kindness making a point of thanking him for assistance during the 2010 Carmel forest fire, the 2011 siege of the Israeli Embassy in Cairo and for missile interceptors against Hamas last year.

I’m sure this only infuriated Obama more because he knew what was coming.

Second, Netanyahu made a point of linking Iran with ISIS:

Don’t be fooled. The battle between Iran and ISIS doesn’t turn Iran into a friend of America.

Iran and ISIS are competing for the crown of militant Islam. One calls itself the Islamic Republic. The other calls itself the Islamic State. Both want to impose a militant Islamic empire first on the region and then on the entire world. They just disagree among themselves who will be the ruler of that empire.

In this deadly game of thrones, there’s no place for America or for Israel, no peace for Christians, Jews or Muslims who don’t share the Islamist medieval creed, no rights for women, no freedom for anyone

So when it comes to Iran and ISIS, the enemy of your enemy is your enemy.

The difference is that ISIS is armed with butcher knives, captured weapons and YouTube, whereas Iran could soon be armed with intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear bombs. We must always remember — I’ll say it one more time — the greatest dangers facing our world is the marriage of militant Islam with nuclear weapons. To defeat ISIS and let Iran get nuclear weapons would be to win the battle, but lose the war. We can’t let that happen.

How wonderful it would be if we had a President who spoke with such candor?

Third, Netanyahu exposed the folly of entering a nuclear deal with Iran and directly addressing National Security Adviser Susan Rice’s argument during her address to AIPAC yesterday in which she stated:

(W)e cannot let a totally unachievable ideal stand in the way of a good deal. I know that some of you will be urging Congress to insist that Iran forego its domestic enrichment capacity entirely. But, as desirable as that would be, it is neither realistic nor achievable. Even our closest international partners in the P5+1 do not support denying Iran the ability ever to pursue peaceful nuclear energy. If that is our goal, our partners will abandon us, undermining the sanctions we have imposed so effectively together. Simply put, that is not a viable negotiating position. Nor is it even attainable. The plain fact is, no one can make Iran unlearn the scientific and nuclear expertise it already possesses.

Here’s how Bibi replies:

My friends, what about the argument that there’s no alternative to this deal, that Iran’s nuclear know-how cannot be erased, that its nuclear program is so advanced that the best we can do is delay the inevitable, which is essentially what the proposed deal seeks to do?

Well, nuclear know-how without nuclear infrastructure doesn’t get you very much. A racecar driver without a car can’t drive. A pilot without a plan can’t fly. Without thousands of centrifuges, tons of enriched uranium or heavy water facilities, Iran can’t make nuclear weapons.

Iran’s nuclear program can be rolled back well-beyond the current proposal by insisting on a better deal and keeping up the pressure on a very vulnerable regime, especially given the recent collapse in the price of oil.

Now, if Iran threatens to walk away from the table — and this often happens in a Persian bazaar — call their bluff. They’ll be back, because they need the deal a lot more than you do.

Iran’s nuclear program can be rolled back well-beyond the current proposal by insisting on a better deal and keeping up the pressure on a very vulnerable regime, especially given the recent collapse in the price of oil.

Now, if Iran threatens to walk away from the table — and this often happens in a Persian bazaar — call their bluff. They’ll be back, because they need the deal a lot more than you do.

Iran has just rejected the Obama Administration’s proposal of a 10-year nuclear freeze. Of course, it’s a bad idea because Iran would simply resume its nuclear program in a decade’s time (assuming it behaved in good faith). But this follows a familiar pattern. The Obama Administration makes a demand, Iran says no and the Obama Admnistration drops the demand. Benjamin Netanyahu could teach President Obama a great deal about the art of negotiation. But a petulant pupil seldom follows the advice of a sage teacher.

Well, I have a feeling Obama is going to have deal with this sage teacher for a lot longer than he wants.

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