James Bowman

James Bowman, our movie and culture critic, is a resident scholar at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. He is the author of Honor: A History and Media Madness: The Corruption of Our Political Culture, both published by Encounter Books.

Make Plans to See ‘The Wedding Plan’

 

Others have pointed to the fairy-tale quality of Rama Burshtein’s Hebrew-language movie (with subtitles) The Wedding Plan, but the comparison with folk art can bear a little elaboration, I think. For there is something of the fairy tale, not only in the movie’s high-concept subject matter — which is a young woman’s seemingly insane confidence that […]

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Open Season on Marriage

 

Once a long time ago it was thought that the only thing more shaming to a man than being a cuckold was being a wittol or wittold, which was a cuckold who knew he was a cuckold and didn’t do anything about it. Now the word is all but gone out of the language — […]

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‘Manchester by the Sea’ — Why It’s Not for Me

 

Though I am not, curiously, tortured with guilt about it, I confess to a prejudice. I don’t like acting. Or perhaps it’s only “acting” I don’t like? It’s so hard to tell the difference — especially now that it has become so prestigious an art that no actor does not aspire to it. It has […]

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Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ Is Torturous

 

Not many years since, it would have seemed impossible for an American director with a popular following and a career filled with golden opinions from practically the whole critical fraternity to offer up to an admiring public an apologia on behalf of Japanese torturers and murderers of Christians, both foreign and domestic, even if both […]

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‘La La Land’ Is Lacking

 

We live in an age of parody. Parody men, parody women, parody marriage, parody politicians, parody scholars, parody movies, parody reality. And the quickest way to become a social or a critical or a moral or an intellectual outcast is to fail to take the parody for the genuine article — if only by noticing […]

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What Makes Mel Gibson’s ‘Hacksaw Ridge’ an Excellent War Movie

 

It’s depressing that all the reviews, pro or con, of Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge seem to have felt constrained to mention Mr. Gibson’s various offenses against political correctness and common decency — which these days are becoming one and the same thing — of 10 or a dozen years ago. I don’t see any need […]

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The Banality of ‘American Pastoral’

 

One of the running gags in The Simpsons has to do with Homer’s mother, who left Abe Simpson when Homer was a child to become a Weatherman-type terrorist. She has been on the run from the police ever since blowing up the Montgomery Burns institute for research into biological warfare back in the 1960s, and […]

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‘Sully’ Sullied?

 

Whatever else it does or doesn’t do, Clint Eastwood’s Sully makes an interesting case study for those of us who think a lot about the relationship between movies, or popular culture in general, and real life. Because the whole story of “the Miracle on the Hudson” on January 15, 2009 took only seconds to unfold, […]

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Come On, ‘Hell or High Water’

 

The headline to the Los Angeles Times review of Hell or High Water reads as follows: “When the banks steal from you, is it OK to rob them?” Pretty clearly, to ask the question is to answer it. Why would you not rob them, if you had the chance? This kind of moral illiteracy is […]

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‘Florence Foster Jenkins,’ A Great Movie of Our Times

 

One of the more subtle bits of humor in Stephen Frears’s Florence Foster Jenkins, based with reasonable fidelity on a true story, has to do with Hugh Grant’s rather modest conceit of himself as an actor — or is it that of his character, St. Clair Bayfield? Here is a very successful actor playing a […]

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