I Don't Feel for Felt | The American Spectator | USA News and Politics
I Don’t Feel for Felt
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Just a few more thoughts on the events of the day:

Now, we read that Mark Felt’s family and Mark Felt put out their story solely to make money off it. So, this makes the family’s karma even more unnerving. The father, patriarch, Mark, took out his anger and frustration for being passed over at the FBI, by ruining the career of the peacemaker, Richard Nixon. So, he condemned a whole subcontinent to genocide and slavery and poverty to please his own wounded vanity. (Maybe his nickname should be “sour grapes” and not “deep throat” because he has as much in common with that fox as with a porn star.) And, blood will tell, as the old saying goes: his posterity is now dragging out his old body and putting it on display to make money. (Have you noticed how Mark Felt looks like one of those old Nazi war criminals they find in Bolivia or Paraguay? That same, haunted, hunted look combined with a glee at what he has managed to get away with so far?)

And it gets worse: it’s been reported that Mark Felt is at least part Jewish. The reason this is worse is that at the same time that Mark Felt was betraying Richard Nixon, Nixon was saving Eretz Israel. It is a terrifying chapter in betrayal and ingratitude. If he even knows what shame is, I wonder if he felt a moment’s shame as he tortured the man who brought security and salvation to the land of so many of his and my fellow Jews. Somehow, as I look at his demented face, I doubt it.

Third, correct me if I am wrong about this, but isn’t it a crime not only to dispense classified information but also to receive classified information? Why wasn’t anyone ever prosecuted about this? Is there a statute of limitations?

Finally, there is a lot of debate about whether or not Mark Felt was a hero. Obviously, I don’t think so. I think the hero was Richard Nixon, fighting for peace even as he was being horribly mistreated and crucified just for his fight for peace.

But there was and is a bigger story here. Frankly, Nixon is no longer alive. If he was a hero, he is a deceased hero. Bob Woodward is no one’s idea of a hero. A super businessman and accomplished writer, but no hero. Mark Felt is only Richard Ben-Veniste’s hero. But there are major heroes out there every day. There are 140,000 of them in Iraq and about 15,000 in Afghanistan, at lethal risk every minute of every day. There are a million more ready to go. There are millions of family members of these heroes. Can we possibly, possibly, conceivably forget them? Somehow, I think we have. The lead news stories are almost never about them. The story is about Michael Jackson or about Mark Felt. This is desperately wrong, and I do mean desperately. I am going to write a lot more about this Monday, but in the meantime, let’s remember there’s a war on, and the best and bravest of our nation are dying every day — to protect a great nation, but one which seems lately to have forgotten even what the nation is all about.

Ben Stein
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Ben Stein is a writer, actor, economist, and lawyer living in Beverly Hills and Malibu. He writes “Ben Stein’s Diary” for every issue of The American Spectator.
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