The Fire That Stokes the Left: It’s Not in Gatlinburg, Tennessee
Melissa Mackenzie
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President-elect Trump scandalized the press again today with this tweet:

As a free speech absolutist, I do not agree with Mr. Trump. As a fan of exposing leftists, this is the best tweet ever.

For decades, the censorious Left has shrunk allowable speech. There are all sorts of topics that are off-limits and disallowed. To have them shrieking about Donald Trump’s assault on free speech is profoundly gratifying. It’s also revealing. When the President’s attorney general wanted to make “hate speech” a crime, the Left cheered. When Hillary Clinton in 2006 introduced legislation to ban flag burning, Democrats voted for it. Now, though, the Left with their thinly disguised contempt for America, will fight by any means necessary to keep their ability to burn the American flag. They don’t even know how Trump exposed them and that’s what’s most fun.

Meanwhile, a forest fire rages in Tennessee and the media cannot be bothered. Over 250 dwellings and businesses have been destroyed so far. The fire is being fueled by hurricane-force winds. Beloved landmarks are gone. The New York Times does not care.

Media bias takes many forms. Reporting omissions–the stories deemed unworthy–is the most egregious bias. Because the vast land between the coasts are filled with non-persons, stories outside of New York and D.C. don’t exist. This story-blindness leads to Americans outside those urban centers to feel alienated.

Over and over, the media reinforces the notion that they’re out of touch with the lives of people who are not like them. It’s bigoted. When the news finally deigns to report on stories from the heartland, they’re like Dian Fossey studying gorillas–except less kind. Fossey loves gorillas. Reporters find Tennesseans to be a nuisance.

Gatlinburg, Tennessee burns and the only place to find videos are are local reporters or first-hand accounts via Twitter. People notice these things.

The media keeps getting it wrong. Their four years of pain will be extended to eight years if they refuse to get the message. So far, though, reporters swing from hysterics to condescension and seem to not recognize a news story unless it directly affects them personally. So be it. They’re deciding to learn the hard way. The hard way it shall be.

Melissa Mackenzie
Melissa Mackenzie
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Melissa Mackenzie is Publisher of The American Spectator. Melissa commentates for the BBC and has appeared on Fox. Her work has been featured at The Guardian, PJ Media, and was a front page contributor to RedState. Melissa commutes from Houston, Texas to Alexandria, VA. She lives in Houston with her two sons, one daughter, and a Ragdoll cat. You can follow Ms. Mackenzie on Twitter: @MelissaTweets.
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