Education Gone Wild


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teacher

Teacher Shortage? Try Competition

 

Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to… tinker with markets. That isn’t the original ending to that sentence, but it is certainly accurate. There may be no better place to observe this tangled web than in the education system. At the risk of sounding hyperbolic, nearly every complaint about our […]

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Israel

Scholars at UPenn Condemn U.S.-Israel Friendship

 

Carrying on in the tradition of Edward Said, a comparative literature professor with no expertise in Middle East affairs who became the icon for the anti-Israel pseudo scholars who followed him, Amy Kaplan, the Edward W. Kane Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania, has written a book on the U.S.-Israel relationship. To celebrate […]

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A Crisis in Higher Education: Haidt and Lukianoff Present an Image of Hope

 

Book Review: The Coddling of the American Mind By Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt Penguin Press: $28 | 352 Pages It’s free speech week, and the book to look out for is The Coddling of the American Mind by Greg Lukinaoff and Jonathan Haidt. Our higher education system is out of whack. Students go in […]

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Marx

‘On Your Marx’: Marxist Idiocy at NYU

 

I recently wrote about the Karl Marx bicentennial birthday bash being celebrated throughout 2018 at Carnegie Mellon University. There, at an annual tuition cost of $61,541 (not including room and board), students can bask in lectures like “Why Marx Now,” “How Marx Now,” and the utterly unmissable “The Politics of Everybody: Feminism, Queer Theory, and Marxism at the Intersection,” […]

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Even a Billionaire Can’t Get the Public School Monopoly to Work

 

Late last year, billionaire philanthropist and Microsoft founder Bill Gates announced his foundation would spend another $1.7 billion on public education initiatives over the next five years. Toward the end of his announcement, though, Mr. Gates said something revealing. He reconfirmed his belief in central planning, still looking for reforms that “scale out,” as he […]

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Georgetown Panel on ‘Islamophobia’ Glosses Over Hard Truths

 

In a small, crowded conference room full of Christian icons at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., around 40 people gathered earlier this month to hear two academics from a Muslim background discuss the topic of “Islamophobia” in Europe. The scholars were Enes Bayrakli, a professor of political science and international relations at the Turkish-German University, and […]

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Seattle Mayor Discriminates Against Charter School Students

 

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan recently announced that Seattle will give free ORCA transit cards to Seattle public high school students so they can ride city buses for free. She announced: …Seattle’s youth have been calling for greater transportation equity for a number of years, and I heard them. At my first State of the City […]

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Tech Is Coming for Your Kids Next

 

In a year that has put the untenable practices and politics of Silicon Valley’s tech barons under scalding sunlight, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos has come in for a particularly nasty set of burns. Just to remind ourselves, let’s count them: First, President Trump is incensed at Bezos over his ownership of the Washington Post, one of […]

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The ‘Silent Sam’ Impasse Grows at UNC

 

Last month, protesters at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill took it upon themselves to pull down a controversial 1913 memorial to alumni killed in the Civil War. The university carted the bronze soldier away on a flatbed truck in the rainy night to a still secret location. The statue, called “Silent Sam,” […]

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Harvard Case Could End Affirmative Discrimination

 

If there was ever any question why Harvard University officials adamantly opposed the Trump administration’s rescinding of Obama-era guidelines for race-based admissions decisions, the answer is now clear. Students for Fair Admission v. Harvard — set to go to trial October 15 in federal district court in Boston — could expose how affirmative action has morphed into […]

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