Euro Watch
by | Sep 26, 2019

Does anyone else remember when the United Kingdom had a foreign policy? Thanks to the bandwidth consumption of Britain’s divorce from the European Union, the UK has been conspicuously quiet on international affairs of late. While both Democrats and Republicans…

by | Sep 11, 2019

Tony Blair’s Labour Party — with its centralizing zeal — passed the Civil Contingencies Act in 2004, granting any British government the power to make 30-day-long decrees without having to rely on the House of Commons or the House of…

by | Aug 25, 2019

Recent breathless headlines of impending recession exposed the “experts” more than the economy. In attempting to see over the economic horizon, they appeared more to be seeking to see past this administration. The economy remains sound, even as attempts to…

by | May 28, 2019

In the European Parliament elections, held last week, parties critical of the direction of the European Union made substantial, but not decisive, gains. For the first time since 1979, when direct election of deputies by party lists was introduced, neither…

by | Apr 15, 2019

UPDATE: My dear editor asked me to add some context to this post. First, the imagery of the beautiful sky, billowing smoke, shocked faces, and deep sadness feels like 9/11. It feels bigger than the loss of lives and two…

by | Mar 26, 2019

The European Parliament is about to vote on contentious new regulations that threaten to reshape how the internet operates. This will end a debate started in 2016 over two key provisions to the EU’s Copyright Directive, Article 11 and Article…

by | Feb 6, 2019

The French scholar Patrice Gueniffey, a specialist in the French Revolution and the leading contemporary authority on the Napoleonic era, refers to Walter Bagehot on the two essential requirements of any regime, dignity and efficiency. Without an aura of dignity,…

by | Feb 1, 2019

Later this month will mark the 75th anniversary of the biggest air battle — actually week of air battles — of World War II. Operation Argument, informally known to the flyers who had to execute it and the journalists who wrote about it as Big Week, is not as well-known as other turning point engagements in the war. But it should be. 

by | Jan 9, 2019

In the thick of a demonstration in Paris protesting the unfairness of it all, a French professional boxer assaulted a cop and sent him to the hospital and thence on a fortnight’s sick leave. Demonstrations by men and women wearing…

by | Jul 3, 2018

Near the close of the last century, as the Soviet Union imploded upon its own weight, dysfunction, and corruption, independent states began to emerge out of the ashes. Each with its own chance for true independence, economic achievement and a…

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