William Murchison

William Murchison is a Dallas-based columnist for Creators Syndicate. He is completing a book on cross-currents in modern morality.

‘Science’ Know-It-Alls on the March

 

The multiple thousands who marched throughout America and the world last weekend hoped to whip up support for “Science.” Well. I’m sold. And what next? Do more than a handful doubt the indispensability of Science to the human condition? Science’s God-given nature may in these secularizing times meet with less affirmation than in the old […]

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Life Without Norms

 

What you end up with when the moral barriers topple is, not least, the end of due process at American colleges and universities. It’s a dreadful prospect you likely wouldn’t imagine without having scanned some of the stories on the rape crisis said to be spreading across American campuses. Supposedly, college women are at immense […]

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Rod Dreher’s Rx for Christians

 

Pretty much everybody who reads The Benedict Option, Rod Dreher’s Rx for Christians flailed and battered by modernity, walks away with a tenacious opinion about the book — ranging from “Praise the Lord” to “What’s this guy talking about?”

I see this a high compliment to the accomplished Dreher, blogger and editor for the American Conservative magazine, who has the gift of disgorging well-reasoned sentences and paragraphs faster than many of us can articulate a Starbucks order.

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An Indispensable Nation After All

 

We start to see again why Madeleine Albright, when she was Secretary of State, called America “the indispensable nation.” It was because back then, and before — a long time before; say, from 1941 forward — we were just that: indispensable in terms of power and intentions of the generally beneficent sort. How indispensable we […]

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What? Expect Democratic Senators to Act Like Adults?

 

An uncomplimentary picture takes shape in the mind: the Senate’s Democratic minority (save for a higher-minded handful) standing in a row, thumbs affixed to noses, fingers waving provocatively in the air, mouths emitting a rude sound commonly known as “The Raspberry.” Think we’re going to confirm Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court?! Think we’re going […]

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Health Care and We, The People

 

The Obamacare debacle — we might as well call it by its right name — underscores an abiding truth about democratic politics; to wit, politicians rarely get anything important done. Theirs, save on rare occasions, is the wrong forum for doing important things. In politics you work with open minds and closed minds and reprobates […]

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Judging Judge Gorsuch

 

A guide to the Gorsuch nomination uproar: If you want the federal government to exercise greater and greater power over daily life in America, with minimum backtalk from us, the people, you deplore the prospective elevation of Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. If, by contrast, you regard the expansion or contraction of governmental […]

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Tales From the Health Care Swamp

 

Uh… just a minute. How did we get to this point — poised either to disassemble and haul away Obamacare or spend the next two years in recriminations having to do with how the job was done? Or not done? Could these prospects have faced us under Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, Polk, Lincoln, Cleveland, McKinley? Not […]

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Our Alternative Moral Universes

 

Wild times, these, in America — “students” at Middlebury College driving away a distinguished intellectual with false claims about his “racism”; fiery accusations flooding the land concerning wiretapping and collaboration with the Russian government; name-calling by the present president, directed at his predecessor. And that’s just in the last few days! On and on the […]

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Immigration and How to Think About It

 

May I quote myself? Thanks. I shall: “Immigration is the sincerest form of flattery.” I have used this bon mot on various occasions since coining it for a 1987 speech. I like its accuracy, its brevity, and, not least, the sly pun. Yet as those original Americans — the English — would say, it butters […]

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