Roger Kaplan

Roger Kaplan, a Washington-based writer, covers the Middle East and Africa (and tennis) for The American Spectator.

After Champs-Elysées Attack: Short Guide to French Election

 

Who profits from the terrorism that, once again, claimed a policeman’s life in France? Will the outrage influence Sunday’s presidential election? If French security authorities confirm that the AK-47-armed gunman who shot up a police squad on the Champs-Elysées Friday was indeed directed, or at least inspired by, an Islamist terror movement, you can score […]

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The Man Who Does Not Blink

 

The situation right after the Tomahawks destroyed the Syrian air force on the ground appears to be that the Soviets, excuse me, the Russians, made a perfunctory naval maneuver in the eastern Mediterranean to demonstrate they are not wimps and then contented themselves with a stiff protest and a warning, seconded by the Persian mullahcrats, […]

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Roger the Great

 

A gorgeous crosscourt backhand that caught the other man by surprise, then a breathtaking inside out forehand down the line that downright shocked him: that was the match that was, except for a final service winner, as Roger Federer triumphed at the Miami Open, decisively beating his old friend and rival, Rafael Nadal 6-3, 6-4. […]

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Keeping One’s Head

 

I am not the type of person who says I told you so, but as it happens, I told you so. My view at the time of the Inauguration was counter-conventional, in that I wrote, against the conventional wisdom that a new administration has to hit the ground running and get its big policy proposals […]

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Trump Defends Putin?

 

The most dramatic finale to the football season in memory had even Mr. R. Emmett Tyrrell — a handball player and former member of the storied Indiana varsity aquatic team — glued to the television screen the other day, and it allowed him an occasion to report on the cultural background of this important sporting […]

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Trump’s Fast Start

 

There was something to be said for the extremely fast start the new administration chose to demonstrate how seriously it takes the mandate the American people gave it last November. Within days, they were blocking migrants and visitors from seven countries, withdrawing the welcome mat to refugees, and getting into a shouting match with the […]

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A Hundred Days

 

They say a new president has a hundred days to make his mark, launch his key programs, set the Republic on course. And if he does not do it, it will four years of playing catch-up and getting bogged down in the swamp, the bureaucracies, the opposition, the lobbyists, the special interests, the malcontents, the […]

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Holiday Politics

 

Christmas is a beautiful day and a powerful season, even when it descends into sentimentality. The Christmas Truce, observed on the Western front at the end of 1914, wherein German and French and British soldiers ceased fire on their own initiative and played football instead, is an all-time powerful true war story. But it took […]

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The Five Conservative Generals

 

Of the individuals mentioned as candidates for Secretary of State, what reassures is that they all are serious, prudent men. The question occurs, therefore, why the Washington yak-yak classes should raise their collective eyebrow at the possibility that with the choice by the President-elect of such as David Petraeus (USA, Ret.) or Stanley McChrystal (USA, […]

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Send Mitt Romney to the Congo

 

We at The American Spectator have nought but admiration for the cool, calm, and collected manner in which the president-elect is assembling what in Lincoln’s time was termed a team of rivals. As did Abraham Lincoln, who came to the presidency with less than a majority of the popular vote, Donald Trump finds that the […]

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