Larry Thornberry

Larry Thornberry is a writer in Tampa.

Adios Al

 

“Comedian”/Senator Al Franken has announced he will hit the silk after a maudlin, self-serving, and less-than-honest speech on the Senate floor late this morning. (No, Al, this is about you.) Perhaps now Al can go back to Minnesota and put his feet up in Lake Wobegon with Garrison Keillor. They can swap locker room stories. […]

Continue Reading

A Day Still Living in Infamy

 

There’s never a bad day to remember and salute those who’ve fought to protect America. But there are special days when this is particularly appropriate. December 7 is one of those days. It was 76 years ago tomorrow that the Japanese sneak attack on Pearl Harbor dragged America into a global war that Americans had […]

Continue Reading

More Uncollected Stories by the Queen of Crime

 

Sleep No More: Six Murderous Tales By P.D. James (Knopf, 194 pages, $21) It’s a challenge to write engaging mystery or detective short-stories. Some of the finest crime novelists have tried it with less than gratifying results. The difficulty is easy to spot. It’s devilish hard in the limited confines of the short-story to include […]

Continue Reading

Will Six Times Be the Charm? 

 

U.S. Immigration officials say they will deport Mexican citizen Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, the man who was acquitted of murder and manslaughter charges in San Francisco Thursday in the killing of Kate Steinle. That’s the thing to do, I guess. It sure worked like a charm the first five times we sent this stiff home. […]

Continue Reading

A Great Jurist, Great Writer, Great Speaker, Great American

 

There have been a lot of positive reviews of the late Justice Antonin Scalia’s recently released book of speeches. This will be another one. What’s not to like? The speeches were selected by his son, Christopher Scalia, and a former law clerk, Edward Whelan, from the many the justice delivered over the last 30 years or so of his life. They show not only an articulate and scholarly jurist with a well thought-out and consistent view of the law, but a full-service human being, full of insights and humor about the roller-coaster we call life, which he was very good at living.

Continue Reading

A Half-Century of Battles

 

Neal Freeman’s byline is one that more conservatives should be acquainted with. Happily, those not familiar with this ever-faithful conservative warrior, both a combatant and a clear and able chronicler of the ideological battles, can catch up with him through this collection of columns, articles, and speeches. They cover significant events, trends, and personalities in the conservative movement from the days of Goldwater to the age of Trump. The previously published pieces in Skirmishes appeared in such as National Review, the Wall Street Journal, and, happy to say, The American Spectator. 

Continue Reading

Democrat Blame Game

 

No surprise that Obamacare insurance premium rates are going up this year by large amounts, as they have every year since the Government Medicine Takeover Law was passed during early Obama with zero Republican help. Also no surprise that Democrats are blaming the increases on Donald Trump. That’s right. Donald Trump. It’s pretty clear that […]

Continue Reading

Baseball’s New Organization Men

 

The tone of this Daily News article reflects the current order of things in Major League Baseball (and, I assume, the bushes as well), where the game is increasingly run by GMs and the computer geeks they’ve hired and not by field managers. Baseball men are increasingly being replaced by MBAs and number-crunchers. Spit cups are leaving […]

Continue Reading

Just Two Words

 

Things are looking bleak for Alabama senate candidate Roy Moore, what with more women coming forward accusing Moore of being a cad when these women were girls, and with Gloria Allred pushing herself into the center ring of what is rapidly becoming a political circus. Putting aside the question of whether one believes Moore did […]

Continue Reading

A Veterans Day Bonus 

 

Walking into Publix on Veterans Day, I ran into a thinish old gent coming out wearing a World War II Veteran baseball cap. He spotted my Tin Can Sailors cap and stopped me for a chat. My new friend is 92 now. He was a first-class boatswain’s mate on a Fletcher Class destroyer off of […]

Continue Reading





Send this to a friend