John C. Wohlstetter

John C. Wohlstetter is a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute and London Center for Policy Research, and author of Sleepwalking With the Bomb (2d Ed. 2014).

PC’s Fearsome Due Bill

 

Two recent items offer the latest illustration of how manic adherence to PC norms cripples Western society. Broward’s Bureaucratic Bumbler. We now know who gave the stand-down order that abandoned Parkland schoolchildren to an armed predator: a captain (an affirmative action diversity hire?). The captain ordered a perimeter established, despite the wisdom since Columbine 1999 […]

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Shooters, Schoolkids, Scapegoats & Showboats

 

The recent horror show in Parkland seems to have generated new sentiment that something needs to be done to stop mass shootings at schools. This is fine, but it remains up in the air as to whether the measures chosen will prove effective. History offers cold comfort. Murder Weapons. FBI statistics for 2015 (the most […]

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The Stuff of Dreamers’ Dreams

 

In President Trump’s SOTU was a line that ruffled identity politics feathers: “Americans are dreamers, too.” That many were offended by this innocuous observation — a commonplace idea throughout the history of the republic — is yet another sign of deep societal divisions. And tally another noun hijacked by the political class. This was brought […]

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The Donald’s First Year: Daily Demolition Derby

 

It speaks volumes about the times we live in, that President Donald J. Trump is viewed as being in trouble. We have a stellar Supreme Court justice, and a record dozen judges confirmed (thanks, Mitch) to the federal appeals courts. America’s economy is roaring for the first time in a decade. Congress enacted the biggest […]

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Perils of Prosecutorial Power: Two Roberts

 

Consider the Trump/Russia probe — now a true criminal investigation with the summer impaneling of what likely will be a hyper-partisan grand jury — a tale of two Roberts. One, long gone, warned against abusive prosecutorial power. The other, very much alive, targets a sitting president via pressuring his subordinates. Justice Robert H. Jackson (1892-1954) […]

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Iran: Arms Control Meets the Kübler-Ross Model

 

In 1969, Swiss psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross proposed her famed Five Stages of Grief model. In an eerie resemblance, her model can be applied to Western arms controllers as to how they deal with arms control violations by totalitarian regimes that cheat on agreements they make with Western powers. The K-R model states that patients diagnosed […]

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Free Speech 2017 — At War With the Framers of 1787

 

James Madison, prime drafter of the Bill of Rights, would be appalled to find marauding mobs curbing speakers, but not surprised. This and much more that illuminates today’s struggle over freedom of speech is the subject of a compact volume, The Soul of the First Amendment, by legendary First Amendment constitutional scholar Floyd Abrams. Abrams […]

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Loyalty and Presidents

 

Much has been made of President Trump’s asking his former FBI director for “loyalty” allegedly being improper — in Beltway-speak, “inappropriate.” This arises because loyalty, post-Watergate, has been construed to be blind loyalty — “my president, right or wrong.” This is a caricatured definition of loyalty. No one would argue that if President Trump dispatched […]

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About Trump’s First 100 Days: An Ungentlemanly ‘B’

 

Before prescribing a path for improvement, we begin with a final report card for The Donald’s first 100 days as a student at Presidents University, 1600 Penn. Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20500. 100-Day Report Card: Donald J. Trump (Pres. Class of 2020) Overall Grade: B Donald is a quick presidential study, and has done remarkably […]

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Russia Then & Now: A Tale of Two Visits

 

In 1985 I spent 13 days in Russia — then officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), but which I will call Russia for reader convenience. I traveled with 100 others, under the august auspices of the Smithsonian Institution. After 32 years and countless tectonic intervening events, I recently returned to what — no […]

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