Gilbert T. Sewall

Gilbert T. Sewall, director of the American Textbook Council in New York City, is co-author of After Hiroshima: The United States Since 1945 and editor of The Eighties: A Reader. He is also a reviewer for Publishers Weekly.

Twilight of Identity Liberalism

 

Here it is 2017, and inexhaustible black rage, a White House bathed in rainbow colors, glass ceilings and rape culture, Muslim injustice collectors, and weepy charges of white privilege seem so passé. The nation is on the threshold of something new. The hard left is in a state of narrative collapse and this-can’t-be-happening fabulation. Whatever […]

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Common Sense About Immigration

 

Always virtue conscious, Bubble Americans glow over immigrants. Immigrants enrich the nation. Struggling immigrants embody virtues unknown to low-end white Americans, who are selfish and xenophobic. Newcomers come first. It is the duty of the U.S. to welcome them. That’s what makes America great. That’s who we are. But a large portion of the electorate, […]

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Bubble America and the Phantom of White Nationalism

 

It is wonderful to watch the reptile-quick post-election pivot from White Privilege and Identity to White Nationalism and Supremacy. At a Harvard University conference last week, sour-grapes Democratic campaign communications director Jennifer Palmieri charged that white nationalism and supremacy — she used the words interchangeably — were foundational to Donald Trump’s election victory. These anti-white […]

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Letter From Istanbul — ‘Trump, President!’

 

I woke up in Istanbul at 4:30 a.m., seven hours in front of New York City on Nov. 9. I had long forecast an electoral college Clinton blowout. But the early numbers looked wrong for the Democrats. I went back to sleep, surprised, but certain they would change. Hours later over breakfast, looking out at […]

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America in the Age of Bad Emperors

 

No matter who wins the 2016 election, the American political scene brings to mind Rome in the age of bad emperors. The days of a wise Trajan or Hadrian seem distant. The republican politics of a Cato or Cicero, long gone and barely recalled. The dowager empress plots her triumphal entry and revenge. The man […]

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Rolling Stone Goes to Trial

 

Journalist Sabrina Rubin Erdely has been on the stand in Charlottesville’s federal court the last few days, defending her indefensible acts. “It was a mistake to rely on someone whose intent it was to deceive me,” she cried, weeping at her own misfortune. Nicole P. Eramo, a former associate dean of students at University of […]

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Angela’s Angsts

 

The Sept. 20 Financial Times headline reads: Merkel forced to change tack over refugees after Berlin election blow, underneath a photo of Afghan-born Chelsea bomber Ahmad Khan Rahami’s defiant hate stare from a gurney, and U.S. president Barack Obama’s feeble warning to Americans “not to succumb” to fears of terrorism.  The (Sunday) Sept. 18 Berlin electoral defeat for Germany’s chancellor Angela Merkel […]

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The Happy Chipmunks at Garfield Elementary

 

This month about 35 million children will arrive at 98,000 public elementary schools nationwide, and James A. Garfield Elementary is one of them. Parents want Garfield to be a happy place, and by and large it is. The principal calls it the Chipmunk Family. Chipmunks are the school mascot. But what walks into Garfield is […]

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Melissa Click Bait at Gonzaga

 

University of Missouri, with Yale, was one of the first politically driven campus explosions during the 2015-16 academic year. Last fall, Black Lives Matter-fueled demonstrations triggered a threatened football team boycott and the president’s resignation. Missouri has since seen a steep drop in enrollments. During one demonstration communications professor Melissa Click called for “some muscle” […]

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No Hiding in Hyde Park

 

A provocative cover letter sent last week to entering University of Chicago freshmen along with a book on academic freedom started the school year with a bang, when the respected college dean of students John Ellison declared: we do not support so called “trigger warnings,” we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics prove […]

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