Gilbert T. Sewall

Gilbert T. Sewall, director of the American Textbook Council in New York City, is co-author of After Hiroshima: The United States Since 1945 and editor of The Eighties: A Reader. He is also a reviewer for Publishers Weekly.

The Woebegone Garrison Keillor

 

I know several clever people who think Garrison Keillor is funny. Many fell in love with his “A Prairie Home Companion” in the late 1970s and 1980s. Now he’s like Lawrence Welk for aging yuppies. They are devastated by yesterday’s news. Minnesota Public Radio announced it was terminating all contracts with Garrison Keillor and his […]

Continue Reading

Germans Being Germans: Who’s Afraid of Alternative for Germany?

 

Germany is in an unexpected political stalemate. This month, coalition talks among quarreling parties collapsed, leaving who will govern the country in question. If it is unable to form a new government, Germany could hold national elections again, a dismal prospect for all. In September, Germany’s chancellor Angela Merkel and her dominant Christian Democratic Union […]

Continue Reading

Race Hoax as a Military Weapon

 

The race hoax at the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs has unraveled. The hoaxer, a black football player and prospective cadet at its prep school, is exposed and gone. Racial slurs scrawled across dorm whiteboards were fakes, the student’s own. But Air Force Academy superintendent, Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, demonstrates no chagrin for the […]

Continue Reading

Resigned to Heaps of Trashiness — And the Next Sutherland Springs

 

In 1958, twenty-two years after he wrote Brave New World, the Englishman-moved-to-Los Angeles Aldous Huxley revisited his book and the future. Of democracies, Huxley said, “Under the relentless thrust of accelerating over-population and increasing over-organization, and by means of ever more effective methods of mind-manipulation, the democracies will change their nature.” World population was then […]

Continue Reading

Listening to the Screams

 

The nation is less socially hopeful and generous than in years leading up to Barack Obama’s presidency. In 2008, voters signed up for an untested junior Illinois senator who promised them racial harmony and a post-racial nation. They got Black Lives Matter and a war on cops instead. The retreat from faith in the charitable […]

Continue Reading

Europe in Flux

 

French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel opened the global Frankfurt Book Fair last week, preaching European unity and cultural diversity to thousands of book buyers, agents, editors, and publishers. But French author Michel Houellebecq’s appearance and reading from Submission stole the show. “There are so many groups trying to spread hatred, fanaticism, and dogmatism, […]

Continue Reading

The Revolt Against Diversity’s Inquisitors

 

President Donald J. Trump, for all his defects, speaks to white Americans, badgered ceaselessly, told to renounce their heritage and confess ancestral sins. Too many of them — millions — have put up quite a while with censure they feel is unwarranted and unjust. They are in revolt against their priestly inquisitors, and a new […]

Continue Reading

Asians on Campuses

 

When the New York Times reported that the Justice Department’s civil rights division might investigate and litigate “intentional race-based discrimination” on campus, focusing on earlier complaints from Asians at Harvard University, affirmative-action engines roared into action, with the inevitable exhaust about racism and privilege in America. In the vaporous world of college admissions, of course, “intentional […]

Continue Reading

White Privilege — and White Fragility — Take No Summer Holiday

 

Late summer is a nice time on college campuses. Summer session and sports camps wind down, and professors head for the lake. But social justice warriors who are busy parlaying race, gender or oddity into tenure or turf don’t take vacations. Transformation is what they do. Race and gender remain flash points. But keeping the […]

Continue Reading

The Fourth of July in Postmodern America

 

July 4 is a national holiday that celebrates the creation of the United States of America in 1776, a day for patriots of all flavors. With the festivities and fireworks comes a salute to all those who have made the nation what it is. As the Founders knew, a self-governing nation requires exempla virtutis, ideal […]

Continue Reading





Send this to a friend