Gilbert T. Sewall

Gilbert T. Sewall is co-author of After Hiroshima: The United States since 1945 and editor of The Eighties: A Reader. He is director of the American Textbook Council in New York City.

Germany’s Immigration Angst Deepens 

 

Since 2015, the influx of about 1.4 million Middle East and North African migrants into Germany — almost all of them Muslim — has destabilized the nation’s politics and society. One of them, Ali Bashar, an Iraqi said to be 20 years old, was arrested on Friday in Kurdistan, the prime suspect in the rape […]

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De Blasio Plays the Race Card

 

Long regarded as springboards to success for the talented urban poor, New York City’s eight selective high schools offer spots for 5,000 ninth-grade students each year. Under the current system, Asian kids predominate. They make up 74 percent of the population at Stuyvesant, 66 percent at Bronx Science, and 61 percent at Brooklyn Tech, according […]

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The Pilgrims Arrive at the Border

 

Pueblo Sin Fronteras (People Without Borders) hit a home run this spring in the competitive game of political spectacle. The caravan — one of many opportunistic migrations from Central America during the last few years — arrived in Tijuana last week, depositing several hundred itinerant Hondurans at San Diego’s border gates with great fanfare and […]

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Frog-Marching to Revolution

 

The lightning-fast takedown of Fox television host Laura Ingraham last week signals escalating partisan fevers that show no sign of breaking or going away. News viewers today want something quick and lurid, something that’s “entertaining,” and they want it Twitter-brief. Many tune in to watch a fight club and are quick to change a channel […]

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March For Our Lives: A Report From Gotham

 

New York City On Saturday morning, news helicopters whirred loudly in the skies of Manhattan, hovering over Columbus Circle and Central Park to film the March For Our Lives anti-gun rally. As many as 100,000 marchers marched from Central Park West to Midtown on Saturday in favor of gun control, organizers said. The exact number […]

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The Shape of Hollywood — Losing the Plot

 

According to Nielsen ratings, this year’s Academy Awards ceremony was a huge bust. The hoped-for watchers did not tune in, and the number of viewers tumbled. The television audience fell 19% from last year’s broadcast, the Wall Street Journal reports, continuing a multi-year slide for the landmark show. It took less than twenty-four hours for Hollywood’s […]

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Juvenile Viciousness Is Here to Stay

 

Millions of horrified television viewers yesterday watched terrified students running from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, sick with fear, hands up. A 19-year-old former student who had been expelled had shot up the school, killing 17 students and injuring many more. Americans have faced such slaughter many times now. But the Parkland shooting […]

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Dumbing Down the Smart Museum

 

Friends of the University of Chicago often profess its humanities and social sciences have largely escaped postmodern infection. But no institution is immune, and recent developments at the David and Alfred Smart Museum of Art, the university’s teaching collection, should dispel intramural complacency. According to Alison Gass, the recently appointed director, Chicago looks to build a “museum committed to thinking about the […]

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Rainbow Textbooks Adopted in California

 

Late last year, the California board of education brought to an end a decades-long campaign to emphasize lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender historical figures in state social-studies / history textbooks, approving K-8 volumes that make identity politics of all kinds the core of the subject. California has had enormous influence on the nation’s history textbooks […]

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The Woebegone Garrison Keillor

 

I know several clever people who think Garrison Keillor is funny. Many fell in love with his “A Prairie Home Companion” in the late 1970s and 1980s. Now he’s like Lawrence Welk for aging yuppies. They are devastated by yesterday’s news. Minnesota Public Radio announced it was terminating all contracts with Garrison Keillor and his […]

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