Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire, but Hillary Clinton Gets All the Delegates | The American Spectator | USA News and Politics
Bernie Sanders Wins New Hampshire, but Hillary Clinton Gets All the Delegates
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Last night seemed like a runaway success for “outsider” candidate Bernie Sanders. He beat Hillary Clinton by a solid twenty points, in every single demographic. He made it next to impossible for Hillary Clinton to say that she’s won the “hearts” or “minds” of New Englanders, and while he’s definitely had home court advantage, he performed better than even he could have reasonably expected.

But while Bernie may have earned all the accolades, Hillary Clinton – not Bernie Sanders – will come away with most of New Hampshire’s delegates

And you thought politics was fair? Shame on you.

Though Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary in a landslide over Hillary Clinton, he will likely receive fewer delegates than she will.

Sanders won 60 percent of the vote, but thanks to the Democratic Party’s nominating system, he leaves the Granite State with at least 13 delegates while she leaves with at least 15 delegates.

New Hampshire has 24 “pledged” delegates, which are allotted based on the popular vote. Sanders has 13, and Clinton has 9, with 2 currently allotted to neither.

But under Democratic National Committee rules, New Hampshire also has 8 “superdelegates,” party officials who are free to commit to whomever they like, regardless of how their state votes. Their votes count the same as delegates won through the primary.

Six of those superdelegates are already committed to Clinton, giving her a grand total of 15 delegates, although she only fairly won nine. There are two superdelegates who are currently listed as “uncommitted,” which means, if DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who is firmly in Clinton’s camp, has anything to say about it, they’re simply “Future Clinton voters,” if they intend to earn the DNC’s support for their future campaigns – as “superdelegates” are mostly highly placed elected officials, party chairs and DNC members in their respective states. Accordingly, it shouldn’t surprise you to know that among the current crop of DNC superdelegates, the vast majority are already committed to Clinton.

Also accordingly, although Clinton has won only one of two primaries (Iowa, and even then by a razor thin margin), because she has these commitments, she already has a commanding lead over Bernie Sanders in the delegate department. Sanders, who has won almost all of his delegates the traditional way, has 42 delegates so far.  Clinton has a whopping 394.

Unfortuantely for Sanders, this means that he will have to finish with commanding leads in all upcoming primaries. He will have to work day and night to secure not just South Carolina, but Florida, Minnesota, Nevada and most of the so-called “SEC” primary states – the ones at play on Super Tuesday. But even then, he may be unable, outside of a complete and total Clinton collapse, to overcome the resources of a party machine hell bent on Hillary Clinton as their Presidential nominee. The Democratic party is looking a big less “democratic” day by day, huh?

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