genocide

Special Report

Regrets Over Rwanda

By 4.11.14

On April 6, 1994, a plane was hit by a missile over the Rwandan capital of Kigali. Everyone onboard was killed, including Rwanda’s president, Juvénal Habyarimana.

Even twenty years later, it remains uncertain who shot down the plane. But what happened immediately afterwards is very much known, seared into the minds of those who bore witness and branded forever on Rwanda’s soul. Hutu extremists blamed the Tutsi ethnic minority for the president’s killing and began a program of mass extermination. By the time they were finished, 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were dead, most of them hacked apart with medieval weapons like machetes and axes.

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Pol Pot Painter Passes Away

By on 9.7.11 | 2:14PM

Vann Nath, whose ability to skillfully paint and sculpt images of Pol Pot made him one of only seven survivors of the horrific tortures at Tuol Sleng prison in the 1970s, passed away Monday. After the Vietnamese drove the Khmer Rouge regime from power in 1979, Vann painted many depictions of the atrocities carried out at the prison, also known as S-21, and at Choeung Ek, the best-known of the Killing Fields where prisoners were executed and dumped into mass graves.

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Naval Officer was Rescued from Communists

By on 11.29.10 | 2:02PM

This is a really cool story. Michael Misiewicz, born in Cambodia as Vannak Khem and now commander of the destroyer USS Mustin, is returning to the country for the first time since he was whisked away in 1973 as a young boy to escape civil war. Just two years before the country fell to the communist Khmer Rouge and dictator Pol Pot, Vannak's father arranged for him to be adopted by an U.S. embassy employee who was preparing to leave. From AFP:

But his mother's tearful goodbye is engraved in his memory. "My mom was so, so upset. I promised her I'd buy her a big house one day."

The young Cambodian built a new life for himself in his adoptive country, enlisting in the navy after graduating from high school in Lanark, Illinois.

It was while he was attending the US naval academy that he began to learn about the atrocities that had taken place in his homeland. Misiewicz had received no news from his family and assumed the worst.

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Blowing Up the Climate Skeptics

By on 10.1.10 | 1:19PM

Referring to the video that Chris mentioned earlier, it was absolutely despicable. It is still on the web but I will not link it or embed it. The theme was alarmists in leadership exhorting their underlings (like a teacher and her schoolchildren) to take steps to reduce their carbon emissions by 10 percent. Those who didn't raise their hands (yes, children) in favor of the program were literally blown up by their leader with the push of a button. Their blood and guts splattered those around them, as graphically as you can imagine -- no, more than you can imagine. The message: climate deniers must die an extremely violent death.

The video is the work of a group called 1010.org, and they claim that Sony is one of their partners. They also list extremist Bill McKibben of 350.org as another partner.

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So Much for Remorse and Humility

By on 7.27.10 | 2:30PM

A number of articles I saw yesterday, in preparing my piece for today's main site, noted how prosecutors planned to appeal the lenient sentencing of Khmer Rouge jailer Kaing Guek Eav by the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia.
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Genocide Confession a Legal Ploy?

By on 7.9.10 | 11:49AM

It was always possible that Cambodian jailer Kaing Guek Eav (aka Comrade Duch) took responsibility for more than 15,000 deaths under the Khmer Rouge regime in the hope that his apparent contrition would win him a lighter sentence, despite his sometimes over-the-top claims of culpability.
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Time for Matthews to Go

By on 2.2.10 | 10:00AM

 try to avoid commenting about or rebuking Leftists, especially those on television networks whosetiny viewership reflects their extremism, but Chris Matthews on Friday blurted a remark so ridiculous and so offensive that it ought to cost him his job -- even at bottom-scraping MSNBC.
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Khmer Rouge Jailer Had Brother-In-Law Tortured

By on 9.16.09 | 2:37PM

Another astounding confession came from Khmer Rouge jailer Kaing Guek Eav (nicknamed "Comrade Duch," pronounced "Doik") yesterday, during the first of an expected handful of trials of officials who served under Cambodian dictator Pol Pot in the late 1970s.
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Cambodian Court Corruption

By on 9.1.09 | 11:17AM

One aspect about the trials of top officials in the despotic Khmer Rouge regime that I have not addressed so far are the problems of corruption and cronyism with the U.N. and Cambodians who put the court together.
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