If you search the Internet for “reading aloud to children,” you’ll see a number of results describing the huge benefits to children. If you search the Internet for “reading poetry to children,” you’ll find more such results. It’s too bad the results don’t describe the benefit of bonding between adult and child. My children often, and gratefully, remind me of the times I would read to them, including J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. For my own part, before I could read, I vividly remember seeing, and hearing the caption for the illustration for, such events as Lot’s wife turning into a pillar of salt, the serpents biting the Hebrews in the wilderness, Elijah in flight in a chariot of fire, and Absalom’s hair fatally entangled in a tree.

It’s time to do my part to revive The American Spectator’s long and rich tradition of compiling excellent reading lists for Christmas. This time I do it with a twist, though. Some of the books I’ll list here are ones I haven’t quite finished yet, and…

Yes, Virginia, after thousands of books, lectures, debates, veteran memoirs, and documentaries, there is still something to say about World War II that advances our knowledge of that tragic, deadly and totally unnecessary world conflagration that claimed 65 million lives and changed the shape of the world. Military historian and Hoover Institution fellow Victor Davis Hanson says it in his huge, dense, and important new book.

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