Paul Johnson

Paul Johnson is the author most recently of Churchill (Viking). His books include Modern Times, Intellectuals, and A History of the American People

Rockwell of Ages

 

The best exhibition held in London in 2011 was at the Dulwich Picture Gallery and featured the works of Norman Rockwell. The show was also at the National Museum of American Illustration in Newport, Rhode Island, but for those who missed it, the splendid catalogue, Norman Rockwell’s America …In England, by Judy Goffman Cutler and […]

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Tony for President

 

Tony Blair is the great mystery man of British politics. “Is,” not “was”: for we have not heard the last of him yet. Outwardly smiling, open, frank, and uncomplicated, he is inwardly complex and unfathomable. His recently published memoir, A Journey, was attacked on all sides long before publication, and its contents gutted in newspaper reports. […]

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Brother, Can You Spare a Euro?

 

The blundering efforts of European leaders to save the ultra-profligate Greek economy may bring down the euro, sooner or later, by forcing the Germans, in their own self-interest, to pull out of the common currency and revert to the Deutschmark. If that happens the French will leave it too, resurrecting the franc. The rest of […]

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When the Going Isn’t Good

 

The huge cloud of poisonous ash, spewed forth from an Icelandic volcano, was a painful reminder of our precarious dependence on air travel. It shut down the airports of northwest Europe for a week and left 20 million people stranded. One of my sons, on vacation with his family in Tuscany, due to fly back […]

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The Real Way to Save the Planet

 

The Copenhagen Summit was bound to fail if only because politicians are beginning to realize that ordinary voters do not believe in man-made Global Warming, as polls plainly show. They did not believe in Marxist Dialectical Materialism either, or Freudianism. These three pseudo-sciences have a lot in common, not least their ability to inspire a […]

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The Joy of Portraiture

 

Painting the human face and form, the most difficult and precious of the fine arts, reached its maturity in 15th-century Florence and 16th-century Venice. Thereafter it was elaborated and varied by a succession of great masters for 300 years, until in the late 19th century it went into sudden and irrational decline. The 20th century […]

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Freedom and Property

 

The connection between political liberty and the individual ownership of property is one of the great certitudes of human society. It is carved in granite, at least in the English language, where the words “freedom” and “freehold” come from the same root and have impinged on and interrelated with each other through many centuries, from […]

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Indispensable Encounters

 

This review appears in the July/August 2007 issue of The American Spectator. To subscribe to our monthly print edition, click here. Counterpoints: Twenty-Five Years of The New Criterion on Culture and the Arts Edited by Roger Kimball and Hilton Kramer (Ivan R. Dee, 500 pages, $35) FOR MORE THAN TWO CENTURIES, beginning with the Edinburgh […]

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Operation Overload

 

The Fire: The Bombing of Germany 1940-1945 by Jorg Friedrich, translated by Allison Brown (Columbia University Press, 552 pages, $34.95) Firestorm: Allied Airpower and the Destruction of Dresden by Marshall De Bruhl (Random House, 368 pages, $25.95) Sixty years after the event, the mass bombing of Germany still raises anxious thoughts, and reading these two […]

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It Could Have Been Hotter

 

This review appeared in the April 2006 issue of The American Spectator. To subscribe, click here.

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