Patrick J. Michaels

A Green Mess: Is EPA in Hot Water Over Alaska’s Bristol Bay?

 

Alaska’s Pebble Partnership, which owns the rights to the second-richest copper-gold deposit on earth, is at the center of one of the premier resource issues of our time. Environmentalists and sportsmen are concerned that mining the deposit will despoil Bristol Bay, home of the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery. Investors in Pebble obviously want the […]

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Federal Climatologists Pen Fantasy Novel

 

Despite his onerous duties as head of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Rajenda Pauchari had the spare time to publish (in 2010) a bawdy sex novel called Return to Almora.  Going him one better, a team of 240 U.S. scientists (whose common bond is that they consume oodles of federal dollars) […]

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Carbon Copies

 

The Kansas Legislature has wisely written a proposed tax on carbon dioxide emissions out of this year’s energy legislation. That’s the good news: As originally written by the Committee on Utilities, the Sunflower Energy bill’s CO2 tax would have been a first, and a very bad precedent. The bad news is that the original bill […]

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More Ice Than Ever

 

The Washington Post recently ran a shocking above-the-fold article warning us of “Escalating Ice Loss Found in Antarctica.” A new paper by Eric Rignot of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows a net loss of ice where most scientists thought the opposite would occur. The Post went full-bore with this one, spreading the article on to […]

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Corn on the Mob

 

Indonesia is a land in turmoil, home to massive volcanoes, tsunamis, and earthquakes. On Monday, January 14, it experienced a brand new type of disturbance, the world’s first food riot caused by another nation pandering to the global warming mob. Indonesians took to the streets, demanding that their government to do something about the price […]

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Not So Hot

 

If a scientific paper appeared in a major journal saying that the planet has warmed twice as much as previously thought, that would be front-page news in every major paper around the planet. But what would happen if a paper was published demonstrating that the planet may have warmed up only half as much as […]

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Inventing The Whirlwind?

 

Is one of our most respected federal agencies guilty of inflating the number of named tropical storms in recent years? So writes Eric Berger in a recent Houston Chronicle article that got hyped around the world, thanks to Matt Drudge. First, some unfaint praise: Throughout the years, the National Hurricane Center has probably saved more […]

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Unnatural History

 

Hurricane Katrina — a very big storm by any measure — has now been called the “largest ecological disaster in U.S. history,” according to the Christian Science Monitor, because it “killed or damaged about 320 million trees.” Moreover, Katrina was a double ecological whammy, as the downed trees will eventually rot or burn, releasing another […]

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The Fires This Time

 

Blame California’s mega-fires on global warming. Or at least that’s what Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said last week in the Hill. Global warming affords endless opportunities to test glib hypotheses by politicians who have no training whatsoever in fields of which they claim pontifical knowledge. And Reid’s statement is easy to test. By […]

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Gore’s Noble Challenge

 

Al Gore has finally won his Nobel Prize, reminiscent of the proverbial little nut that stood his ground, evolving into a giant Oak. Now we can only hope that he runs for President, an office that, given recent history, surely deserves him. Where else — except perhaps via the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, which […]

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