Neal McCluskey

Neal McCluskey is an education policy analyst for the Cato Institute.

America’s Test Score Fail

 

Newest test scores are more bad news for centralized education, common core.   This morning I read an op-ed by Douglas Holtz-Eakin tackling the chasm between what it takes to enroll in college and how ready for college students actually are. It is a yawning gap, and Holtz-Eakin rightly laments it. But then he pulls […]

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Newest Test Scores Are More Bad News for Centralized Education, Common Core

 

This morning I read an op-ed by Douglas Holtz-Eakin tackling the chasm between what it takes to enroll in college and how ready for college students actually are. It is a yawning gap, and Holtz-Eakin rightly laments it. But then he pulls the ol’, “Common Core is a high standard,” and suggests that it will […]

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Clinton’s Debt-Free Tuition Plan Seems Likely to Flunk

 

Over the next couple of days, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will be playing up her new, $350-billion proposal primarily intended to make paying public college tuition a debt-free experience. Beware “free”! According to early information about the plan — I couldn’t find details on Clinton’s campaign Web page yet — under the proposal the […]

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Sorry Taxpayers, Paying You Back Is Bad for My Bliss

 

If I had more time I’d write at greater length about this already infamous New York Times op-ed on student loans – which conspicuously fails to mention that the writer apparently got all of his degrees from pricey Columbia University – but the piece largely condemns itself. What I think is worth contemplating is how far out of mainstream thinking its […]

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Inventing a Student Loan Crisis

 

College students have lots of “crises” — tough classes, relationship break-ups, homesickness, beer shortages — most of which are fleeting and, frankly, fatuous. One college crisis, however, never seems to end, and while parts of it may be overblown, Congress appears determined to keep pushing it along. The seemingly eternal crisis is the ever-escalating price […]

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No Child Left Ahead

 

Shame on you, South Carolina! You have high academic standards compared to other states, and it’s making you look bad under the No Child Left Behind Act. It’s time to get on the ball, dumb-down “proficiency,” and join everyone else in the race to save face! Indeed, your House of Representatives already got the message, […]

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College Tuition Inflaters

 

Okay, Washington politicians, we get it. Harvard, Princeton, and Yale are hoarding lots of money while tuition prices skyrocket, and states sometimes cut funding to public colleges. That’s all very troubling, but with reauthorization of the Higher Education Act passed in the House yesterday and a final version likely to come up for approval by […]

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Mama Don’t Teach

 

The latest outrage from South Carolina is truly startling. A few weeks ago, the State Board of Education elected a new chairwoman, and get this: She’s a homeschooling mom! That’s right. Incoming chairwoman Kristin Maguire doesn’t think South Carolina’s public schools are right for her own kids. The reactions to Maguire’s election from the local […]

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A Puny Step Forward

 

The Aspen Institute’s Commission on No Child Left Behind recently released Beyond NCLB: Fulfilling the Promise to Our Nation’s Children, a report it touts as offering gutsy proposals to solve the nation’s educational problems. “It’s time to take a bold step forward and commit to significantly improving NCLB,” declares a statement on the report’s back […]

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Subsidy Economics 101

 

To hear the political advocates talk about it, you’d think the economy had a sadistic grudge against twenty-somethings, torturing them with spiking college prices, burning housing markets, and crushing health care costs. We’ve got “the worst of all worlds” for young adults, declared the moderator at a recent New America Foundation forum. “Problems in the […]

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