Religious Freedom

America Can’t Continue to Ignore Middle East Christians

By on 7.23.14 | 10:57AM

The cause of religious liberty galvanizes Americans of faith, yet America's foreign policy has ignored religion to the point of harming her interests and moderate allies in the Middle East.

"America is really, by virtue of its foreign policy, distanced from our natural allies," Andrew Doran, one of the founders of the group In Defense of Christians, told TAS. "They've actually been marginalized over the last several years [by our] commitment to procedural democracy." 

Doran described meeting a Christian man in Lebanon who, having never visited America, asked why Americans do not act when Christians face persecution in the Middle East. Doran told him most Americans do not know that any Christians live in the Middle East. 

"He was dumbfounded," Doran said. "You can tell that any sense of solidarity with the broader Christian world is gone, and they suddenly feel very alone."

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Remaining Iraqi Christians Expelled

By on 7.21.14 | 4:18PM

The most prominent Christian landmark in Iraq was emptied of its Christians on Sunday. Mar Behnam is a Syriac Catholic church that was built by a fourth-century Assyrian king. The church was his penance for killing his son, a Christian convert. It is now under the control of Islamic extremists from ISIS, and the monks having been sent away with nothing but the clothes on their backs, according to AFP. They walked for miles before Kurdish Peshmerga forces picked them up and took them to Qaraqosh. 

The monks were the last Christians to leave the plains of Iraq; a few still live in Baghdad, but the rest have fled to Kurdistan.

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The Curtain Goes Up for Russia in the Middle East

By on 7.1.14 | 4:49PM

Perhaps Americans have forgotten how much of the Cold War was fought in the Middle East, but Russia has not.

Recent events in the Middle East have offered numerous opportunities for greatness in foreign intervention, and Russia, perhaps in a bid to regain the sort of international friend network we now enjoy, has been taking advantage of them.

Syria was Russia's first move. While the chemical smoke cleared and the United States floundered among red lines, Putin benificently arrived with a diplomatic solution. Perhaps it was an atypical role for someone who had spent the last few months supporting Bashar al-Assad's murderous regime; we all know how Russia always hates to see Uncle Sam in a difficult spot. In any case, Putin's plan to remove the chemical weapons from Syria has been largely successful—last week it was hailed as an "unprecedented collaboration" and "success" by the Washington Post and others.

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Hobby Lobby and the War on Nuns

By on 6.19.14 | 5:51PM

The "war on women" continues, but not in the way you might think; in fact, the HHS mandate of Obamacare might be more of a "war on nuns."

This mandate, which wasn't passed by Congress, is the "Thou shalt provide birth control for thy employees" aspect of Obamacare. Among its victims are the Little Sisters of the Poor, a congregation of nuns who serve the elderly, and Mother Angelica's Eternal Word Television Network. Other women are also concerned that this new commandment interferes with the original ten, including Barbara Green and her daughter Darcy Lett, who are part of the family that owns Hobby Lobby. Green's and Lett's case will be decided by the Supreme Court by the end of the month.

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Time For a DTR With Pakistan

By on 6.9.14 | 3:43PM

A relationship may be sown by the seeds of spontaneity, but sooner or later it comes to a DTR—the new small-talk meaning "define the relationship."

It might be time to have a DTR with Pakistan. The Wall Street Journal reported Monday:

The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for attacking Karachi's Jinnah International Airport, which left at least 28 people dead, saying it was seeking revenge for recent Pakistani military airstrikes against them. ...Seemi Jamali, a spokeswoman for Karachi's Jinnah hospital, where the dead and injured were brought, said 18 airport employees and security personnel were killed by the attackers. In addition, 24 were injured, she said. Security officials said that 10 militants were also killed—seven were shot dead, and three blew themselves up with suicide vests.

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Carbons Emissions in China: Is This the Time?

By on 6.5.14 | 10:43AM

The climate change police have been rounding up the usual suspects this week, and states are starting to pull apart the new EPA regulations that aim to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S.

At most, these plans are expected to reduce global carbon emissions by a grand total of 4 percent by 2020, according to the Wall Street Journal. Experts admit that American efforts will be completely eclipsed by the developing world, but others counter that the ultimate goal of this complex regulatory mountain is to set an example for poorer countries, especially China. Reported the Journal

"No matter what your view of climate change, these [U.S.] reductions will be dwarfed by increased emissions in other parts of the world," said Stephen Eule, a vice president at the Institute for 21st Century Energy, part of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

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Constitutional Opinions

A Religious Test

By and 6.26.09

On the sidewalks of Dearborn, Michigan, Christians need to be able to practice their faith too.
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