Race

Holder: Obama and I Are Being Criticized Because We’re Black

By on 7.14.14 | 3:13PM

In a stunning statement, Attorney General Eric Holder told ABC News over the weekend:

“There’s a certain level of vehemence, it seems to me, that’s directed at me [and] directed at the president,” Mr. Holder told ABC News. “You know, people talking about taking their country back.… There’s a certain racial component to this for some people. I don’t think this is the thing that is a main driver, but for some, there’s a racial animus.”

Eric Holder is the first black attorney general serving under the first black president. He went on to defend controversial remarks he made in a speech during his first year in that position:

Mr. Holder also dug down in his comments he made years ago when he called the United States a “nation of cowards” on race, The Hill reported.

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Young People Have Better Views On Racism

By on 5.17.14 | 1:58PM

Jamelle Bouie, a writer at Slate, wrote a piece yesterday which shows that young people have more sensible views on race and racism than their forebearers. Bouie's work also gave me hope that millenials--those born from the about the mid-1980s to the early 2000s--will be the generation that finally casts aside pernicious identity politics and focuses on solving social problems in this country. The end of racial hucksterism and grievance peddling would be glorious indeed. But Bouie writes for Slate, an outfit which regularly peddles racial grievances. So to him, such dramatic improvements are actually a bad thing.

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NPR Wants You To Associate Ice Cream With Racial Guilt

By on 5.15.14 | 9:41PM

Please note that this piece repeats a racial slur in citing an article which ran elsewhere. The slur in that article was not used in a historical, not a pejorative context.

The tune played by ice cream trucks is racist, so you should feel guilty for enjoying a summer treat. Or at least reverently contend with the "intellectual complexity" of racism while you chow down on your Fudgsicle. That is the takeaway from a ridiculous piece on NPR's website by Theodore R. Johnson, III entitled "Recall That Ice Cream Truck Song? We Have Unpleasant News For You." The premise behind Johnson's story is that the jingle played by countless ice cream trucks across the country is from the tune of an old minstrel show song, the lyrics of which drop the n word and perpetuate crude stereotypes. From the NPR piece:

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NBA To Free Speech: Drop Dead

By on 4.29.14 | 3:35PM

I just wanted to dash off some very quick, very angry thoughts about the lifetime ban and $2.5 million fine that NBA Commissioner Adam Silver issued to Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. As Aaron covered yesterday, while Sterling's comments were reprehensible, he has a checkered record when it comes to race relations. But in the final calculation, it really doesn't matter whether the guy is a racist or not. What is important are the troubling implications for free speech and civil society.

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Michelle Malkin Is Wrong

By on 3.28.14 | 1:55AM

I am a big fan of blogger Michelle Malkin. She mastered the incisive internet takedown years before anyone else and remains one of the best in the game. But today she got it wrong in her response to an offensive tweet from comedian Stephen Colbert. Well, partially wrong.

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Special Report

A Challenge To Our Beliefs

By 12.3.13

Depressing news about black students scoring far below white students on various mental tests has become so familiar that people in different parts of the ideological spectrum have long ago developed their different explanations for why this is so. But both may have to do some rethinking, in light of radically different news from England.

The November 9th-15th issue of the distinguished British magazine "The Economist" reports that, among children who are eligible for free meals in England's schools, black children of immigrants from Africa meet the standards of school tests nearly 60 percent of the time -- as do immigrant children from Bangladesh and Pakistan. Black children of immigrants from the Caribbean meet the standards less than 50 percent of the time.

At the bottom, among those children who are all from families with low enough incomes to receive free meals at school, are white English children, who meet the standards 30 percent of the time.

"The Economist" points out that, in one borough of London, white students scored lower than black students in any London borough.

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