Medicare

A Monumental Step in Medicare Transparency

By on 4.9.14 | 3:33PM

In a monumental transparency effort, the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Studies has released Medicare payment data covering $77 billion given to 880,000 practitioners in 2012.

For the first time in 35 years, the public can see how and where their Medicare tax dollars are being spent. The American Medical Association has fought this release for years, fearing that people would jump to misinformed assumptions about the data.

According to Bloomberg, Medicare paid nearly 4,000 physicians $1 million or more each in 2012:

The listing, gleaned from 880,000 providers paid by Medicare, was released this morning. The data, the first look at physician payments by the agency in more than 30 years, showed that most spending fell to a small group of doctors, with less than 3 percent taking in about 28 percent of the $64 billion paid out to individual providers.

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The Right Prescription

Just Walk Away

By 2.2.10

The Medicare mess alone disqualifies the Obamacare bills from further consideration.
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The Right Prescription

Medi-Fraud for Everyone

By 10.23.09

Democrats argue that creating a new government-run health care program will bring efficiency to the system, but the existing programs are rife with fraud.
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The Public Policy

Wicked, Lazy Servants

By 8.17.09

The federal government should clean up its own Medicare mess before taking on the entire health care system.
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The Right Prescription

The Republican Health Care Alternative

By 5.20.09

Today, Sens. Tom Coburn and Richard Burr and Reps. Paul Ryan and Devin Nunes introduce the Patients' Choice Act -- the best Republican alternative to Democrat socialized medicine.
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The Public Policy

Pink Ribbon Reality

By 10.30.08

Candidates can't fight breast cancer while blocking life-saving treatments.
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Entitlements

By on 10.7.08 | 9:57PM

Obama says he'll solve the problem within his first term, then pivots to talking about taxes. McCain talks about entitlements slightly more, saying that we can fix Social Security if the parties come together like Reagan and Tip O'Neill, and that Medicare, is more complicated, so we'll have to do something bold...create a commission! Then he talks more about taxes.

This is the most important long-term domestic issue facing Americans, and neither of the two candidates running for president can think of enough to say about it to give a two-minute answer. How many people think either of these guys will do anything about it once in office.

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