Feminism

What Women Want

By on 7.14.14 | 5:20PM

July 14, according to the United Nations, is Malala Day, referring to the birthday of the Pakistani "girl who stood up for education and was shot by the Taliban."

Malala Yousafzai celebrated her seventeenth birthday by visiting the families of the kidnapped girls from Nigeria. She wrote in the Washington Post that they and other girls worldwide are her "sisters," in need of her help:

I know education is what separates a girl who is trapped in a cycle of poverty, fear and violence from one with a chance at a better future. During my school holidays, I traveled to help my sisters through my organization, the Malala Fund. I have visited refugee camps in Jordan, spent time with girls facing poverty in Kenya, and even been to New York City, where girls face bullying and violence.

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Male Privilege: Not All It’s Cracked Up to Be

By on 6.12.14 | 3:06PM

Yesterday, the Bastiat Institute Facebook page posted this infographic reminding us of the injustice of “male privilege." Feminist outrage expected.

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Miss USA Suggests Self-Defense for Women, Twitter Loses It

By on 6.9.14 | 2:13PM

When asked about sexual assaults on college campuses last night during the Miss USA Pageant, Miss Nevada Nia Sanchez, now Miss USA, delivered what most would deem a fairly noncontroversial response:

I believe that some colleges may potentially be afraid of having a bad reputation and that would be a reason it could be swept under the rug, because they don’t want that to come out into the public. But I think more awareness is very important so women can learn how to protect themselves. Myself, as a fourth-degree black belt, I learned from a young age that you need to be confident and be able to defend yourself. And I think that’s something that we should start to really implement for a lot of women.

Shockingly enough, the eternally outraged #YesAllWomen camp was not happy with Sanchez’s answer. Feminists took to Twitter to express their shock and outrage that a woman would suggest individual empowerment as a means of combatting rape.

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If a New York Times Executive Editor Falls in the Forest, Does It Make a Sound?

By on 5.15.14 | 12:54PM

The news is unbelievable, outlandish, and absurd! Jill Abramson has been ousted from the New York Times. This, of course, is huge news. You know that it's huge news because news outlets tell you so. NPR, Forbes, The Washington Post, and Politico (no less than four times!) have all spilled copious amounts of ink covering Abramson's departure. It has long been rumored that Abramson was a difficult boss to work for. Perhaps the Ban Bossy campaign has backfired. 

The most breathless coverage came from Politico's John Harris and Hadas Gold, who proclaimed that this departure is the departure to beat all departures. The Capo di tutti capi of departures:

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The Inconsistency of Feminism and Sex-Selective Abortions

By on 4.2.14 | 1:07PM

Yesterday the American Conservative published an insightful piece, “Here’s the ‘Missing’ Evidence for S.D.’s Sex-Selective Abortion Ban” by Jonathan Coppage.

Coppage does excellent work researching and explaining the evidence behind sex-selective abortions in the United States, sadly concluding that the facts reveal this practice does, in fact, occur within our borders.

South Dakota just became the eighth state to pass a ban on sex-selective abortions, and in doing so, ignited rage from pro-choice advocates. They immediately conjured up the race debate, claiming laws against sex-selective abortions were inherently discriminatory toward Asian-American women and were entirely unnecessary.

Citing scholarly and journalistic works, Coppage debunks the theory that these abortions never happen in the United States, but gives the opposition a break. He says their arguments that this is not America's primary domestic issue, and that laws alone won’t solve the problem, are viable.

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Another Perspective

V Is for Victimhood

By 2.13.14

What most of us call “love” is actually the violent oppression of women, according to radical feminists. The latest trend in feminism’s decades-long war against human nature recently inspired me to write a Valentine’s Day poem:

Roses are red,
Violets are blue.
The heteronormative patriarchy
Is raping you.

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Breaking News: A Penis Is No Longer A Male Part

By on 2.3.14 | 11:27AM

In the landmark abortion case Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in his opinion, "at the heart of liberty is the right to define one's own concept of existence, of meaning, of the universe, and of the mystery of human life…" In other words, life is all about the quest to craft your own distinct identity. This viewpoint nicely sums up the approach of many contemporary liberals. The problem is that this sort of thinking can cause you to paint yourself into some pretty tight corners. A vivid illustration of this danger is the Salon.com piece entitled "The fight over the 'v' word."

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Slouching Toward Androgyny

By on 6.22.13 | 6:15AM

One of the seminal triumphs of the conservative movement was Phyllis Schlafly's successful crusade in the 1970s that prevented ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. Strange to say, Schlafly's success has been almost entirely abandoned by conservatives who, evidently fearful of being called "sexist," have embraced the culture of androgyny against which Schlafly rallied American women.

For years, I have sought to explain that this is why conservatives are losing -- and now, appear ready to abandon altogether -- the defense of traditional marriage. As I wrote in January 2009:

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Hilary Rosen: ‘I Have Said Enough ‘

By on 4.13.12 | 10:18PM

After igniting a three-day firestorm Wednesday by asserting on CNN that Ann Romney has "never worked a day in her life," Democratic National Committee adviser Hilary Rosen has backed out of a scheduled Sunday appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.

"I have said enough and ... I don’t have anything more to say," Rosen wrote in a note posted to the Meet the Press Web page. "I apologized to Mrs. Romney and work-in-home moms for mistakenly giving the impression that I do not think their work is valuable. Of course it is. I will instead spend the weekend trying to explain to my kids the value of admitting a mistake and moving on."

Rosen's "apology" to Mitt Romney's wife was nothing of the sort: "Spare me the faux anger from the right who view the issue of women’s rights and advancement as a way to score political points." Does that sound apologetic to you?

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