OPM Hack Affects 18 Million Americans and Counting

By on 6.23.15 | 12:22PM

Remember when the Office of Personnel Management assured us that "only" 4 million or so Americans were ultimately affected by the massive Chinese hack that exposed more private internal systems than a Miley Cyrus Instagram post? 

Yeah, let's just say that they wildly underestimated their own personnel management file system. Even their recent admission, that it could be in the ballpark of 14 million files now in the hands of a coalition of Chinese hackers came in a little low. According to a recent report given to Congress, by FBI Director James Comey and obtained by CNN, the number is actually closer to 18 million, and includes personnel files established for job applicants and profiles of Federal family members, not just regular employees. 

Approximately 18 million Americans reportedly had their personal records compromised when hackers attacked the Office of Personnel Management's databases last year.

OPM Made It Very Easy for The Chinese To Hack Their Personnel Files

By on 6.19.15 | 11:31AM

The Office of Personnel and Management was hacked by China recently in what some are calling the worst security breach in American history, bigger it seems than the metric ton of NSA secrets that Edward Snowden piled on The Guardian.

To catch you up, the Chinese apparently wormed their way into the OPM's personnel files and stole, well, everything, from social security numbers to basic personal information files, from pretty much anyone who has ever presented the information to the Federal government, including all employees and applicants. In other words, the Chinese now have the sensitive information of possibly millions of Americans. Now, they've already said that they intend to use that to try to turn certain Americans into spies, which seems inordinately difficult given how much information we already share about ourselves on social media, but the OPM seems relatively unconcerned, and the President has even expressed confidence in how she's managing this ridiculous situation.

Carbons Emissions in China: Is This the Time?

By on 6.5.14 | 10:43AM

The climate change police have been rounding up the usual suspects this week, and states are starting to pull apart the new EPA regulations that aim to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S.

At most, these plans are expected to reduce global carbon emissions by a grand total of 4 percent by 2020, according to the Wall Street Journal. Experts admit that American efforts will be completely eclipsed by the developing world, but others counter that the ultimate goal of this complex regulatory mountain is to set an example for poorer countries, especially China. Reported the Journal

"No matter what your view of climate change, these [U.S.] reductions will be dwarfed by increased emissions in other parts of the world," said Stephen Eule, a vice president at the Institute for 21st Century Energy, part of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Chinese Government Cracks Down Again

By on 1.17.14 | 11:15AM

The Chinese New Citizens Movement's fight for constitutional freedom continues to face fierce opposition from China's new president, Xi Jinping.

Not only did the Chinese government arrest the movement’s leader, Xu Zhinyong, in July for "assembling a crowd to disrupt order in a public place," but the New York Times reported that another 160 protesters like Xu have been arrested over the last year.

What makes Xu such a dangerous threat? His rights campaign has centered on “anti-corruption”—fighting against abuses such as forced relocation of citizens, rape, beatings, and even a contaminated milk scandal.

So Long, Solar

By on 3.27.10 | 9:05AM

Oh, the glory days of almost a month ago, when advocates promoted the promise of solar energy in the United States.

Google’s Hard Line on Free Speech Violations in China

By on 1.12.10 | 5:51PM

Today Google announced on its blog that it had been the target of a China-based cyberattack in mid-December. David Drummond, a senior vice president of the firm, wrote the hackers succeeded in stealing some intellectual property seemed to be aimed at accessing the GMail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. The unwritten assertion is that the Chinese government backed the attack in some way. Google is responding by refusing to continue censoring search results in China and preparing to cease operations in China entirely if necessary to maintain that policy: