Special Report

Special Report

Kerry Urges Clean Elections in Nigeria

By 1.26.15

The situation on the ground in Nigeria is impossible to gauge accurately from the distance and even the well-equipped news organizations such as the AP, AFP, Reuters, or the big Nigerian dailies published in Lagos, such as the Vanguard or the Guardian, are finding it difficult to keep up with the fighting, looting, murdering that has turned the northeast state of Borno into another man-made desert, whose soil is fertilized with the blood of innocents and harvested by psychopaths from the inner circles of Hell.

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Fifty Years Since Winston’s Death

By 1.24.15

It is a few weeks past 140 years since a boy christened Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was delivered at England’s Blenheim Palace. He survived the trenches of France, political reversals, and even being struck by a New York City driver to lead Britain from its greatest peril in May 1940 to victory over Nazism five years later. This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of his death. In the age of radical Islam, can we draw inspiration from his career?

Yes, but only, it seems, from his finest hour. Until his moment arrived in 1940, Churchill was frequently dismissed even within his own party as an imperialist adventurer with baroque ambitions, a throwback to an earlier epoch, an author of military debacles, out of touch with a supposedly emergent world of international comity. In short, he was regarded then as most contemporary liberals might view Ted Cruz or Benjamin Netanyahu today.

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Reflections on Roe: When Margaret Sanger Spoke to the KKK

By 1.22.15

As liberals excoriate Republican Congressman Steve Scalise for speaking to a group with a reported connection to David Duke, former KKK member, I’m reminded today—on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade—of a moment that liberals will never dare acknowledge: a 1926 speech to the KKK by one of their most revered ideological darlings, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger.

Unlike Scalise, Sanger did not unwittingly speak to a group with a link (direct or indirect) to the KKK through a member. No, Margaret knowingly went directly to the Real McCoy—straight to the dragon’s mouth. In May 1926, a hopeful spring day, this progressive icon, this liberal hero, this founding mother of one of liberalism’s most sacred organizations, Planned Parenthood, an organization that liberals demand we fund with tax dollars, went directly to a KKK meeting and spoke at length to the faithful.

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The War for Lake Chad

By 1.20.15

One of the contenders for this year’s foreign film Oscar — the Pulitzer Prize of movies, I am told by a source in Hollywood — is Timbuktu, by the great Mauritanian director Abderrahmane Sissako. The film, which could not be shot on location due to the continuing civil strife in northern Mali, relates the story of a family and a community hit by tragedy. A dispute over a cow that leads to an accidental death would be shattering by itself. It is made worse by the conquest of Timbuktu and the surrounding villages by al-Qaeda-affiliated Tuareg tribesmen, as in fact happened in 2012.

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Lives Not Worthy to Live

By 1.19.15

“Whatever proportions these crimes finally assumed, it became evident to all who investigated them that they had started from small beginnings.”
— Leo Alexander, M.D.

Fundamental truths are often forgotten, if not actively obscured in the Kultursmog. This is very much the case with respect to the integrity of the human person and the inalienable right to life. This week the nation observes the “black anniversary” of Roe and Doe, a good time to engage in the process of remembering.

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The Shirking Man’s Party

By 1.16.15

Rand Paul accuses most recipients of Social Security disability payments of “gaming the system” and calls them “malingerers.”

“What I tell people is, if you look like me and you hop out of your truck, you shouldn’t be getting a disability check,” the Kentucky senator told New Hampshire voters earlier this week. “You know, over half the people on disability are either anxious or their back hurts. Join the club. Who doesn’t get up a little anxious for work every day and their back hurts? Everybody over 40 has a back pain.”

New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley calls the senator’s comments “insulting,” “way out of nowhere,” and evidence of “detachment from reality.” He continued, “Paul is saying that 50 percent of those on disability are committing fraud.”

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Tous Charlie!

By 1.12.15

It struck some observers as perverse to exclude the National Front from the immense rally, held yesterday between the Place de la République and the Place de la Nation, to mark the Islamist terror assault upon the Paris paper Charlie Hebdo, publisher of satirical cartoons featuring Mohammed with a bomb in his turban, among other themes.

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A New Year in Egypt: The Significance of President Sisi’s Speech

By 1.9.15

On New Year’s Day, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi—the hero of Egypt’s 2013 anti-Muslim Brotherhood revolution—made some remarkable comments concerning the need for a “religious revolution.”

Watch the video below or click here to read the excerpt:

Sisi made his remarks during a speech celebrating the birth of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad—which was ironically held on January 1, 2015 (a day not acknowledged or celebrated in the Muslim world as it is based on a Christian calendar)—and he was addressing the nation’s top Islamic authorities from among the Awqaf Ministry (religious endowments) and Al Azhar University.

Although Sisi’s words were directed to Islam’s guardians and articulators, they indirectly lead to several important lessons for Western observers.

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Who Lost Nigeria?

By 1.8.15

Nigeria is not “lost,” and it is wildly premature to put the question of the threat faced by the government of Goodluck Jonathan in such stark terms. However, President Jonathan is up for re-election in February, and it is fair to ask: Is Nigeria at risk of seeing half its territory amputated and seized by a revolutionary movement like the Islamic State?

Last week, federal troops under attack from a band of Jihadists reportedly cut and ran from the garrison town of Baga in the far northeast, next to Lake Chad. There is a reason this is a garrison town and there is a reason it was targeted by the Boko Haram insurgency that has plagued the northern tier of the west African powerhouse, at 180 million the most populous nation on the continent, one of the largest (900 square km), and by any measure an absolutely indispensable strategic ally of the U.S.

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Faust’s Networks: Why the Sony Kill Is Not the Last

By 1.5.15

Modern societies run on a set of networks whose hardware and software represent a modern technology Faustian bargain: achieve unparalleled efficiencies of economic cost and social interconnection at the price of equally unparalleled exposure to several forms of catastrophic “cascade” failure.

Specifically, the hardware and software infrastructures that enable prosperous modern life in advanced societies are relatively simple—and hence increasingly tempting—high-value targets for our enemies. Portents of what we face now have been largely ignored for decades.

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