The Nation’s Pulse

The Nation's Pulse

Two New Developments in Emergency Contraception

By 3.7.14

In the Left’s never-ending effort to enable girls and women to have recreational sex without being “punished with a baby” (as President Obama put it in reference to his daughters awhile back), emergency contraception will now be less expensive and more accessible because of two new developments. Instead of having to take two Plan B pills, a new single-dose version — referred to as Plan B One Step (PBOS) — has been rushed through approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); further, a generic version — at roughly half the price of the original Plan B — can be purchased over the counter by anyone (even though the fine print stipulates that it is for women age 17 and older). So, anyone can go into any drug store and purchase a relatively inexpensive version (at $20 to $40) of a high-potency pill that used to be available only by prescription and under a doctor’s supervision.

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Happy National Condom Week!

By 2.28.14

Did you teens celebrate national condom week with Planned Parenthood? If you thought this was an “adult” celebration, you are mistaken. On the website of Planned Parenthood of Northern New England under the “For Teens” tab, you can find a “contest” to guess how many condoms are in a jar. The winner receives a free Planned Parenthood gift basket (I assume, filled with more condoms).

This is just part of PPNNE’s effort to reach teens and help them to healthily explore their sexuality, free condoms always being a plus. However, if talk about safe sex has become old news, don’t fret. The group’s newest initiative, “A Naked Notion with Laci Green,” is a fantastic resource for all sexually curious young ones.

Miss Green’s YouTube videos talk frankly about sex, including that of a kinkier variety. Planned Parenthood doesn’t even consider advice for teens on bondage and sadomasochism (BDSM) a little “taboo.”

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Entrusting Marriage to Liberals/Progressives

By 2.28.14

What’s happening in Arizona and elsewhere is precisely what I’ve warned people about for some time: Don’t entrust liberals/progressives with the institution of marriage. You do so at great peril to the culture and republic. It’s bad enough to acquiesce to their breathtaking efforts to suddenly redefine an ancient, natural, and Biblical institution. It will be far worse to deal with the unforeseen consequences of their actions.

You cannot and should not dare trust them with this power.

Outside of Arizona, here’s a picture of what we can expect, based merely on a few recent cases:

In Oregon, a couple that owns a bakery, the Kleins, are being sued and called before the state for not making a same-sex wedding cake. The Kleins note such an action violates their Christian beliefs and religious freedom, but the forces of “tolerance” refuse to tolerate the Kleins’ beliefs.

In Colorado, another bakery owner, Jack Phillips, awaits a possible jail sentence for refusing to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple.

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The Pill Pettifoggery

By From the January-February 2014 issue

The petitions for writs of certiorari are granted.” Those eight words, contained in a terse November announcement from the Supreme Court, signaled that the nation’s capital will soon be hit by a constitutional hurricane stirred up two years ago by disregarded legal flaps in far-off courts. At issue is the Obama administration’s contraception mandate, under which all health plans—including those provided by employers such as Catholic hospitals—must provide, free of charge, all FDA-approved contraception, including the morning-after pill.The challenges the court will hear were filed in 2012 by Hobby Lobby Stores and Conestoga Wood Specialties.Both companies operate in accordance with the religious beliefs of their owners, beliefs that include strong moral objections to abortion-inducing drugs. Thus, their lawsuits charge that the mandate infringes upon their religious rights, as guaranteed by the First Amendment and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) of 1993, by forcing them to pay for employee health insurance that covers such drugs.
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Could Noelle Nguyen Get Us To Buy American Again?

By 2.24.14

Can American manufacturing make a comeback?

If Noelle Nguyen has anything to say about it then the answer is yes.

In 2012, Nguyen founded American Love Affair, an online company specializing in high end clothing and jewelry manufactured in the U.S. American Love Affair’s mission is to become “the online destination for all things American made.”

Based in Los Angeles, American Love Affair directly employs up to 20 people (depending on the season) and hundreds more indirectly through outsourcing to companies based in the United States that are involved in manufacturing, distribution, and logistics. The genesis of American Love Affair came about while Nguyen was pursuing her MBA at Pepperdine University.

So why did Nguyen name her business American Love Affair? Why is she so passionate about this country? Recently, I had the opportunity to correspond with Nguyen to discuss her passions and pursuits.

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Aphor-Centric

By 2.21.14

Technology is the means by which the smartest make society stupider.

That’s all I got for one-line wisdom today. An Ivy League professor of German’s success in the Twitterverse with such short-and-sweet truths has led him to escape the academy for an everyday living as an aphorist. To coin a tweet, “Good luck with that.” When has the medium in which congressmen kill their careers, and rowdy teenage partiers broadcast their lawbreaking to their parents, the cops, and local Ron Burgandys ever lent itself to deep thoughts?

The New Yorker informs that Eric Jarosinski’s inability to fulfill rigorous publish-or-perish requirements — Can you believe those Ivy League troglodytes don’t grant equal status to tweets and scholarly articles? — compelled him to withdraw from tenure consideration at Penn. Instead of finishing a book, the professor tweeted, nearly 30,000 times, beginning in early 2012. His social media pursuits occupy a full paragraph, enough to fill four tweets, in his three-paragraph professional biography, which also mentions that he’s still working on that book.

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Misdirected Fire

By 2.18.14

When Paul Chesser turned a spotlight on “Blueprint NC” in this space last month, he did his homework, which is more than can be said for some of the local columnists now arguing about whether Reverend William Barber II, the best-known supporter of Blueprint NC, is a political asset or a political liability. At the Raleigh-based News & Observer, one J. Peder Zane, an opinion writer in the “Barber is a liability” camp, declared that “Religion can be a vital force in our personal lives, but it has no place in politics.” Zane then went on to suggest that morality has “almost no place in our politics,” either.

Fish, meet barrel. The problem from Zane’s point of view is that morality is inflexible, which puts it at odds with anything that relies on “adaptation and change” to the extent that democratic politics must.

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Nice Guys Finish Last

By 2.14.14

In watching both the recently released Netflix documentary Mitt, as well as NBC’s putting out to pasture of Jay Leno (again), I was struck by the current cultural attitudes toward those generally perceived as “nice” people. Apart from the hackneyed “If it bleeds, it leads” response you’ll get from most people when the topic of how we treat household names in the media comes up, there is a real (and I would add sick) pleasure Americans experience when nice guys finish last.

We like jerks. And if someone isn’t a jerk, but we don’t like their politics or street-cred as a performer, we call them jerks louder and longer than the actual ones all around us.

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Big Waistlines, Big Government

By 2.14.14

Beware Cap’n Crunch, Hamburglar, and Aunt Jemima. Atticus Finch and Perry Mason, or at least their less scrupulous peers, come for their cut.

“It’s not a matter of casting the food industry as villains,” Paul McDonald, a Chicago lawyer, explained to Politico of his plea to more than a dozen state attorneys general that they sue for obesity-related health-care expenses. “There’s a cost of what they’re doing that they’re not internalizing, and the taxpayers are paying for it. The states don’t have many choices.”

The fatsos surely do: Corndog or carrots? Gumbo or granola? Slurpee or seltzer? Sometimes the fatty, sugary deliciousness makes it as though the choice makes itself. Americans are fat, and it’s not their fault. Just ask them — or Paul McDonald. They want to have their cake and eat it two, three, four pieces over.

Our national gluttony is written on our waists. But it more dangerously influences our government and courtrooms. Attorneys and politicians, like a Mr. Limbkins-sized Oliver, forever cry, “I want some more.”

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Philip Seymour Hoffman, Our Imaginary Friend

By 2.7.14

Philip Seymour Hoffman, who overdosed over the weekend on a drug that knows no correct dosage, exhibited extraordinary gifts in Capote, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Doubt, Boogie Nights, and The Master. But his on-screen persona convincing people who never met him that they knew him well stems less from his theatrical capabilities than the capabilities of the theater.

“At my office today everyone is talking about the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman and how great of an actor he was,” a letter writer to Dear Prudence explains. “I made the comment that while he was talented, he was also a junkie who just left three children without a father. I am now getting the cold shoulder from many colleagues.”

CNN’s Ashleigh Banfield floated the idea of charging the people who sold him heroin with “felony murder.” The bespectacled host told viewers that “the guy who gave an addict the drug that killed him deserves to go away for life.”

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