Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the May 2011 issue

Greenwich Time

A prospective lawyer for William Jefferson Clinton on some faraway day when things really get tough for him makes an audacious argument for the accused in Connecticut Superior Court:

The lawyer for a Shelton man accused of sexually assaulting his neighbor's horse claimed Thursday the case has been blown out of proportion.

"If this was a guy and a sheep in Litchfield, and I've had a few of those cases, this would not have gotten nearly the media attention it has," said Ralph Crozier, who represents 63-year-old Marian Wegiel.

"But I guess because a horse is higher off the ground it leaves a little more to the imagination."

Wegiel, of 11 Partridge Lane, is charged with cruelty to animals, fourth-degree sexual assault, third-degree criminal trespass, and second-degree breach of the peace in the October 18 incident.

(February 18, 2011)

CNSNews.com

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the March 2011 issue

Washington Post

Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and 19 other innocents are shot by a mentally deranged barbarian who believes in mind control and this is what appears in the Post news story-not commentary, news story:

Her 2010 Republican opponent, 29-year-old former Marine Sgt. Jesse Kelly, held campaign events under the slogan "Help remove Gabrielle Giffords from office" and invited his supporters to "shoot a fully automatic M16 with Jesse Kelly."

(January 9, 2011)

New York Times

Precious thoughts from Aurelie Sheehan, "director of the creative writing program at the University of Arizona," apparently perpetrated with the encouragement of the editors of the imbecilic Times:

I spent early Saturday morning writing a short story set in Tucson. I've lived here for a decade, but it's only recently that I've felt I can claim the place as a subject. The impetus for writing about it hasn't been love so much as anxiety, a sense that it's in danger somehow-on many fronts.

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the February 2011 issue

New York Times

Bug-eyed and sputtering, professor Paul Krugman avers another implausible explanation as to why the Liberals were trounced in the recent election and sent unceremoniously to history's necropolis, there to reside with the Nudists and the Prohibitionists:

Have you heard the one about how there's been an explosion in the number of federal regulators? Mike Konczal of the Roosevelt Institute looked into the numbers behind that claim, and it turns out that almost all of those additional "regulators" work for the Department of Homeland Security, protecting us against terrorists.

Still, why does it matter what some politicians and think tanks say? The answer is that there's a well-developed right-wing media infrastructure in place to catapult the propaganda, as former President George W. Bush put it, to rapidly disseminate bogus analysis to a wide audience where it becomes part of what "everyone knows." (There's nothing comparable on the left, which has fallen far behind in the humbug race.)

(December 24, 2010)

Newsweek

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the December 2010 - January 2011 issue

Newsweek

The Republicans' frightening blueprint for America as seen by comrade Jonathan Alter before heading to Cuba for some dental work:

In brief: repeal health-care reform, so if you lose your job and your kid gets sick, you may have to sell the house; repeal financial reform, so Wall Street scammers and predatory lenders can return to doing everything they did before they wrecked the economy; maintain corporate-welfare subsidies that move jobs overseas; reduce spending by slashing education funding; and ending all clean-energy projects aimed at curbing our dependence on Mideast oil. Republicans insist on extending $700 billion in tax cuts for the wealthy and leaving the $500 billion defense budget untouched.

(November 1, 2010)

The Nation

At our favorite lunatic haunt, editorialist JoAnn Wypijewski demonstrates once again that silliness begets silliness while Dr. Joycelyn Elders continues her crusade for silent pleasures:

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the November 2010 issue

The Great Books Series

Jimmy Carter, who confided to NBC's Brian Williams that "I feel my role as a former president is probably superior to that of other presidents," demonstrates what he means in a few brief passages from his White House diaries:

October 1 [1980] Fifty-six years old. If I'm reelected, I'll be sixty when I go out of office-a good retirement age. [...]

October 25 I went to Grand Rapids, Michigan. I found out later I called it "Cedar Rapids." [...]

October 26 I talked to Amy on the phone about the upcoming debate. I won't see her again for about a week. She said that the atomic bomb was the most important issue, and we had a discussion about what a kiloton was, what a megaton was. She discusses international issues, including the hostage crisis, almost like an adult. [...]

Monday, November 3 ...Almost all the undecideds moved to Reagan. Strangely enough, my favorable [ratings] went up-both the way I handled the Iran situation and the percentage that thought it was used for political purposes. There was a general sense of rejection of incumbents. [...]

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the October 2010 issue

Washington Post

Under the headline, "Glenn Beck's gun-toting followers," spiritualist Dana Milbank traduces a model citizen for one little miscue in an otherwise irreproachable life and presumably for watching too much television:

Late on a Saturday night two weeks ago, an unemployed carpenter packed his mother's Toyota Tundra with guns and set off for San Francisco with a plan to kill progressives.

When California Highway Patrol officers stopped him on an interstate in Oakland for driving erratically, Byron Williams, wearing body armor, fired at police with a 9mm handgun, a shotgun and a .308-caliber rifle with armor-piercing bullets, Oakland police say. Shot and captured after injuring two officers, Williams, on parole for bank robbery, told investigators that he wanted "to start a revolution" by "killing people of importance at the Tides Foundation and the ACLU," according to a police affidavit. His mother, Janice, told the San Francisco Chronicle that her son had been watching television news and was upset by "the way Congress was railroading through all these left-wing agenda items."

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the September 2010 issue

Frank Rich is on vacation.

New York Times

How did we miss this? A reviewer of Sam Tanenhaus's The Death of Conservatism cries the crocodile's tears for gloved ladies with parasols, men with pork chop sideburns, and God knows what other delusions he longs for in his fantasy of the good old days:

One puzzling feature of American politics is that the people who call themselves conservatives seldom want to conserve anything. The modern conservative movement promotes radical transformation while ignoring classical conservative ideas-for example, Edmund Burke's respect for established institutions and custom, for continuity with tradition and for incremental change.

(September 29, 2009)

The Great Books Series

Author Stan Cox continues his war against the air-conditioner from his outpost in Salina, Kansas, where nobody objects to his body odor, halitosis, or general untidiness, as long as he stays in his basement and keeps the windows closed:

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the July 2010 - August 2010 issue

The Great Books Series
Hot off the press -- Prof. David Farber's ill-timed The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism lists the prof's hallucinatory problems "bequeathed" by American conservatism to incoming President Barack Obama on January 20, 2009. And now that our modern-day FDR has waved his magic wand, conservatism is in even deeper trouble:

The remnant of the conservative movement found itself without sure direction or answers to the problems that the long conservative ascendancy had bequeathed to the American people -- harrowing economic inequality, a devastated industrial base, ecological dangers, massive government debt, a broken health-care system, a failing social-safety net, and diminished international power.
(From The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism, by David Farber, Princeton University Press, 296 pages, $29.95)

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the June 2010 issue

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Wall Street Journal
The clever editors at the invaluable Wall Street Journal publish yet another impenetrable column by their house Liberal, Thomas Frank, in their ongoing clandestine intrigue to demonstrate the tediousness of the Liberal mind:

Indeed, the revelations about porn consumption at the SEC must be a libertarian's own wet dream. Here you have a libertarian cause célèbre -- the endless, uncontrollable oceans of Internet pornography -- somehow drowning that libertarian bête noir, regulatory enforcement. Polymorphous perversity itself managed to muzzle Big Brother.

How awesome is that? Why it's as awesome as if Any Rand herself returned to earth and -- shrieking, "bow to Goldman Sachs, parasites!" -- led the bank industry's lobbyists to victory over the financial reform bill.
(April 28, 2010)

Chicago Sun-Times
The noble vision of A. Lincoln lives on in the dirty mind of Hon. Edolphus Towns (D-NY):

Now that the health-care reform is out of the way, it is time for Congress to tackle another matter of major importance: potty parity.

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Current Wisdom

Current Wisdom

By From the May 2010 issue

American Prospect
An exigent dialectic on the pages of AmPros between Adam and Gabriel demonstrates yet again that at least among Liberals there really has not been much evolution since the era of Cro-Magnon man, and that these two nitwits presumably have been college educated has not helped:

Dialogue: Fat of the Land

Adam Serwer: Michelle Obama has launched a campaign against childhood obesity, which some critics say amounts to "fat shaming." But obviously she's not just saying that being overweight is bad, and I think a bit of pressure from the right people can be effective.
Gabriel Arana: All the shame in the world hasn't made us any thinner. And this "pressure" can also lead to eating disorders.
Adam: That's true; it's not a solution by itself. But some encouragement from family members or other loved ones, as opposed to a society-wide stigma, can help.
Gabriel: But so much obesity is related to poverty and access to good food. How much will stigmatizing it help resolve poverty and access issues?

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