Another Perspective

Another Perspective

The Pope and Rush Limbaugh

By 12.3.13

You’d have thought the president of the NRA had called for the tarring and feathering of mourning dove hunters! All it took for Pope Francis to bring down on himself the Wrath of Rush Limbaugh last week was to disrespect — or appear to be disrespecting — capitalistic economics, in the context of calling for a new Christian evangelism.

“The worship of the ancient golden calf,” said the pope, “has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose.” Further: “The culture of prosperity deadens us; we are thrilled if the market offers us something new to purchase.” There was, to make matters worse, some severe language regarding “trickle-down economics” and that good old Darwinian notion called “survival of the fittest.”

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Nuclear Hide and Seek

By 11.29.13

The world press followed the Kabuki theater of negotiation among the G5+1 and Iran as if it was a traditional “give and take.” But the Iranians had already won the contest before it began. No matter the conclusion of the six month test period, the Persians already have acquired and stored enough weapons-grade nuclear material to arm several missiles. It may not be of the highest destructive concentration, but it can work. And that’s all that’s needed.

The Obama administration, accompanied by its allies, has convinced itself that the Iranians are unable to hide the crucial accumulation of weapons grade uranium. This is a false assumption. The North Koreans had effectively camouflaged their progress and continue to do so. What Pyongyang is now missing is the ability to reliably deliver its weapons on target.

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Kennedy’s Wall

By 11.26.13

Rick Santorum's grandparents had three photographs hanging on a wall in their home when young Rick was growing up: Jesus, the pope, and John F. Kennedy. Back then, Santorum recalled in an October 2011 speech to College of Saint Mary Magdalen students, "Kennedy was an icon." Later, after reading one of Kennedy's speeches, Santorum "almost threw up."

Kennedy's September 1960 address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association "was the beginning of the secular movement of politicians to separate their faith from the public square," Santorum griped. "He threw faith under the bus."

But had the former presidential hopeful read about what came after Kennedy's infamous speech, he would have acknowledged that there were many who were far more gag-worthy than Kennedy.

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Yankee Doodle Came to Town

By 11.25.13

The NSA’s ability to intercept electronic communications worldwide is actually the hope and ambition of every other comparable service around the globe. America’s enemies (overt and otherwise) are many, so it is only logical that the U.S. government would want to have the ability to know everything it can about the communications of those aligned against them. Unfortunately it is impossible to track the bad guys without invading the privacy of others whose countries are used covertly as sites for various aspects of what is most succinctly referred to as bad guy activity logistics: finance, cover, safe havens and weapon supplies, etc. (This means having access to domestic exchanges, though access does not necessarily, an indeed rarely does, mean monitoring—both in legal and functional terms the distinction is essential.) 

It’s a vast job requiring vast resources. Alas, its vastness was never supposed to be public knowledge. One talented but unscrupulous traitor has changed that and given impetus to an explosion of righteous indignation even from the many sister services that had been profiting from shared information.

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Goodbye Camelot; Hello Heaven

By 11.22.13

On November 22, 1963, it would seem no one else died that day but President John F. Kennedy—so well-seared into the American collective psyche is that event. Fifty years after the fact, the assassination of our Golden Boy president is so prevalent one would think it happened just 50 days ago. His death—mostly the controversy of it—has inspired decades worth of media on the subject. There is at least one new movie to be released this year, no doubt hoping to join the ranks of films like Oliver Stone’s JFK. More than a handful of books are penned year after year on the charismatic couple, their Camelot-like time in office, and John's controversial death. This year is particularly flooded. One publishing company alone is releasing eight new books on the topic and re-releasing over a dozen more.

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Remembering Bill Bixby

By 11.21.13

Much of this week has been focused on the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy and I plan to chip in my two cents before the week is out.

However, I want to mark the anniversary of the passing of another notable individual. On November 21, it will have been 20 years since the death of actor/director Bill Bixby. A fixture on American television from the early 1960s to the early 1980s on shows such as My Favorite Martian, The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,and The Incredible Hulk, Bixby was only 59 when he succumbed to prostate cancer in 1993.

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

Twisted Sister

By 11.20.13

Dick Cheney’s gruff manner never made him a very convincing advocate for so-called gay marriage. Nor did Lynne Cheney’s back-to-the-classics kick — she came to national attention, recall, as a Bill Bennett-like voice for the restoration of Western civilization — exactly lend itself to such advocacy.

Now blunt Liz has reiterated her position on the question, making it clear that she won’t be joining in the family charade. “I do believe in the traditional definition of marriage,” she told Fox’sChris Wallace last Sunday.

The chattering class is, of course, harrumphing over this remark, accusing Liz of backing her campaign bus over her lesbian sister Mary as it wobbles towards a double-digit defeat. In a typical comment, Robin Abcarian of the Los Angeles Times pouts: “What kind of woman sells out her sister for a shot at a U.S. Senate seat?”

Send to Kindle

Another Perspective

A Very Dangerous Game

By 11.20.13

New York City police authorities are investigating a series of unprovoked physical attacks in public places on people who are Jewish, in the form of what is called "the knockout game."

The way the game is played, one of a number of young blacks decides to show that he can knock down some stranger on the streets, preferably with one punch, as they pass by. Often some other member of the group records the event, so that a video of that "achievement" is put on the Internet, to be celebrated.

The New York authorities describe a recent series of such attacks and, because Jews have been singled out in these attacks, are considering prosecuting these assaults as "hate crimes."

Many aspects of these crimes are extremely painful to think about, including the fact that responsible authorities in New York seem to have been caught by surprise, even though this "knockout game" has been played for years by young black gangs in other cities and other states, against people besides Jews -- the victims being either whites in general or people of Asian ancestry.

Send to Kindle

Pages