Politics

The Case That Could Dismantle Obamacare

By on 7.7.14 | 4:10PM

A high-profile, yet little-covered case is making its way through the D.C. Circuit Court. The ruling in that case could topple the bureaucratic behemoth known as Obamacare. The case rests on the legal and textual interpretation of a section of the law.

According to Newsweek:

It all started in 2011, when Jonathan H. Adler, a conservative law professor at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, shot an email to his friend Michael Cannon, a health policy expert at the libertarian Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. Adler thought he had spotted an error in Obamacare that could unravel a significant portion of the law.

Over at Cato, the argument is clarified:

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Meet Sam Alito — From Phillies Fandom to the First Amendment

By on 7.7.14 | 3:54PM

The political press is going through a Samuel Alito renaissance in the wake of last week's high-profile Supreme Court decisions (Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Harris v. Quinn), both of which were authored by the amiable associate justice.

"Samuel Alito’s moment," proclaims Politico.

"Meet Samuel Alito, the Most Important Conservative in America Today," runs the headline at National Journal.

Forget them. If you really want to understand Sam Alito — from his Phillies fandom, to his New Jersey roots, to his judicial philosophy of originalism with interpretation — read my colleague Matthew Walther's recent cover story on the man, who sat for a multi-hour interview with The American Spectator. It begins this way:

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A Conservative Case for Organized Labor

By on 7.7.14 | 1:54PM

The Daily Beast declares that “the right has good reason to keep organized labor alive.” They are correct, which is surprising, but they miss a few things worth thinking about, which is perhaps less surprising.  

Responding to the Harris v. Quinn Supreme Court decision, James Poulos argues that Justice Kagan’s dissent points to the imminent issue in labor politics: the purpose of unions’ existence.

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Move Over Jimmy Carter: Obama Most Unpopular President Since World War II

By on 7.3.14 | 1:39PM

A poll released by Quinnipiac University this morning has some devastating numbers for President Obama. The title of the poll, “Obama is First as Worst President Since WWII,” says it all, but let’s look at some of the other numbers.

According to Quinnipiac, Ronald Reagan is seen as the best president since World War II, with 35 percent taking that view. Reagan almost doubled Clinton’s 18 percent, with JFK trailing close behind Clinton at 15 percent. When you break down the results, the independent vote makes the difference, with 66 percent of Reagan’s support coming from that block. Meanwhile, Clinton’s support tends to be more partisan, with 34 percent of his vote coming from Democrats.

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Liberal Tolerance is on a Roll

By on 7.2.14 | 11:12AM

This week has been a bad one for the left. The meltdown after both the Hobby Lobby and Harris v. Quinn cases yesterday put the tolerance of the left on full display. Liberals took to their Twitter and other forms of media to vent their frustration. Some even hilariously went after SCOTUSBlog, a privately run blog independent of the Supreme Court.

But now the “opened-mindedness” crowd has found a new target: black conservatives.

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Hobby Lobby Becomes a Precedent as EWTN is Saved in Another Court Fight

By on 7.1.14 | 5:02PM

The Catholic media company Eternal Word Television Network (EWTN) won a reprieve late Monday from the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in light of the Supreme Court decision in favor of Hobby Lobby. The Alabama non-profit is contesting the entirety of the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate, rather than just four of the required contraceptives as Hobby Lobby was. EWTN would have had to begin paying fines for contraceptives Tuesday while it pursues its own court case.

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Rand Paul Makes His Move

By on 7.1.14 | 4:31PM

Last night Rand Paul scored a major victory in securing his front-runner status for the 2016 presidential election. According to Politico, Paul announced that former Iowa GOP chair Steve Grubbs will be in charge of Paul’s RAND PAC.

This new addition is crucial to Paul’s push into Iowa, where Paul supporters just lost their footing and power in the state GOP executive branch. Per Politico:

The Iowa GOP central committee voted Saturday to fire the state party chairman and replace him with a fixture of the establishment.

Danny Carroll, removed on a 14-2 no confidence vote, will be replaced by Jeff Kaufmann, formerly the Speaker Pro Tem of the state House.

This was hardly a surprise, however:

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First-World Activism: The Paradox of Social Justice

By on 7.1.14 | 2:05PM

A recent satirical article titled “What I learned about capitalism by walking into a Starbucks and screaming ‘capitalism!’ at the Barista over and over until they had to call the police" was written in jest, but it spoke to a frightening trend. First-world activists have redefined themselves as anti-capitalist proponents of “social justice.”

Social justice is not justice in the traditional sense, but rather a fancy pseudonym for what liberal activists deem to be “fair.” Traditional justice means equality of opportunity, not the equalizing of economic classes.

In his book The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame, Peter Dreier glamorizes what he calls “practical idealists,” a group of people who confuse fairness with equality of outcome, and hide their Marxist intentions behind the word “social justice.” 

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Dateline Hillandale: Who’s the Real Threat?

By on 7.1.14 | 11:02AM

Well, this was unexpected. It’s not everyday you find your old neighborhood lambasted on the Spectacle.

Perhaps you’ve read Bill Zeiser’s bare-fisted slam on the “limousine liberals” who reside in Hillandale—the gated Georgetown community Janet Yellen calls home. I can’t imagine Bill’s blog post took him on assignment to the 20007, but I’d like to offer some personal context. You see, I used to live there…albeit in the comparative steerage of a rented townhome, where I resided with friends while in graduate school. 

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Political Hay

An Unlikely Primary in Louisiana

By 7.1.14

It’s been a month since Louisiana Republican Party chairman Roger Villere took to the stage at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans and announced that, by a unanimous vote of the party’s executive committee, the LAGOP would be endorsing Congressman Bill Cassidy over Colonel Rob Maness and state Representative Paul Hollis as its candidate against Democratic incumbent Mary Landrieu.

In that time, several of the party’s parish executive committees—including three major units in Jefferson and St. Tammany Parishes in suburban New Orleans and Rapides Parish in the central part of the state—have followed suit to endorse Cassidy. The St. Tammany endorsement was perhaps the most interesting of the three, in that Maness is actually a member of that committee.

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