The Spectacle Blog

The Day Lou Gehrig Became The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth

By on 7.4.14 | 12:42PM

The Fourth of July is synonymous with American independence. 

But it also marks one of the most important events in the history of baseball.

It was 75 years ago today that New York Yankees legendary first baseman Lou Gehrig bid baseball farewell. Gehrig, who had played in 2,130 consecutive games going back to 1925 and had driven in 100 or more runs for 13 consecutive seasons, inexplicably lost the ability to play. Gehrig was soon diagnosed with ALS, a disease so rare that it would bear his name. He would play his last game on April 30th.

The Yankees chose to honor him on the Fourth of July prior to a doubleheader against the Washington Senators. Although Gehrig was educated in Columbia University, he was reticient man who did not like the spotlight. However, on this day, Gehrig would deliver one of the most memorable speeches in American history.

Gehrig would be dead less than two years later.

 

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