The Spectacle Blog

Obamacare’s Cosmetic Surgery

By on 4.1.14 | 12:18PM

Breitbart columnist John Sexton is reporting that the LA Times claims 9.5 million previously uninsured Americans now have health insurance. But almost half – 4.5 million – are on Medicaid. Countless others signed up through the health care exchanges and are receiving subsidies to make their insurance affordable. Another 3 million simply piggy-backed on their parents’ plans.

Then of the 6 million the government claims have enrolled on Healthcare.gov, even the Times admits that only 2 million were previously uninsured. (And who knows how many will actually pay their premiums?)

Sexton’s main point was that expanding Medicaid and allowing adult children to remain on their parents’ insurance would have been enough to solve 80 percent of the problems that Obamacare’s bureaucratic labyrinth “fixed," while saving billions of dollars, hours of time, and the mental health of the country.

Although dumping people onto Medicaid and offering increased subsidies only pushes the burden onto taxpayers, at least we would have avoided the pain of canceled plans, rising premium and deductible costs, and emotional turmoil.

The saddest part? The data that David Catron shared yesterday:

During the second week in March, for example, it was widely reported that “reform” was driving down the uninsured rate. And the 15.9 percent rate repeatedly cited is indeed lower than last year’s peak. Conspicuously absent from these reports, however, was any mention of the percentage that prevailed before Obamacare passed—14.4 percent.

In other words, even after all this, there are more Americans uninsured today than there were in 2010. That's after adding 4.5 million Medicare enrollees, and helping 3 million adults re-attach the umbilical cord to their parent’s plans and another alleged 2 million navigate the mess of Healthcare.gov.

Or 2,000 pages, 30 delays, four years and hundreds of stupid advertisements later.

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