The Spectacle Blog

The Most Incredible Story of Resilience Ever to Grace the Pages of the New York Times

By on 2.1.14 | 3:30PM

One day in the foreseeable future, high school students will no longer read Elie Wiesel's Night to learn of the incredible bounds of human resilience. They will instead read the memoir of Vanessa Csordas-Jenkins. They will read, and they will be inspired. Who is Vanessa Csordas-Jenkins, you might ask? Only the subject of the most harrowing story you will ever read in the New York Times. Csordas-Jenkins suffered indignities that no human being should ever have to suffer. And she did so with grace and dignity that only be described as vintage Csordas-Jenkins.

Our story begins with Ms. Csordas-Jenkins, a junior at NYU, relegated to slumming it in a dorm building because her plans to live off campus with friends in trendy Brooklyn fell through. That alone would be enough to stop most sane people in their tracks. But she soldiered on. Unfortunately, the dorm was too noisy for her liking because she "needs to be a healthy person." So she fled those inhumane conditions. It was the moral equivalent of fleeing the gulag.

Of course she had only meager resources. Her budget—or rather, her parents' budget, as the Times informs us—was $1,850 a month. And you won't believe what they tried to get her to accept for that price. A place that was slightly farther away from the NYU campus than she wanted. “It seemed like the potential for a really stressful situation for me if I woke up late and had to wait for the train,” she said. The train! Can you imagine the stress of having responsibilities each day and having to wake in a timely fashion so as to meet those responsbilities, and even having to account for complications in the process? Who does that?!? And even after finding a place, she had to deal with a clogged sink. Those of us with less grit would simply wilt.

Vanessa Csordas-Jenkis is a hero in the true sense of the word. It is shameful that President Obama's health care legislation will leave Americans like her high and dry once they hit 26 and can no longer remain on their parents' plans. That's just too soon to grow up.

There are many publications out there that focus on the interests of the elites. Thank goodness the Times is out there as well, with stories like this that matter to the little guy. Thought I suspect that even the Times real estate reporters are in on the joke this time.

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