The Spectacle Blog

Little Moments of Bias

By on 12.14.05 | 12:02PM

Media bias comes in packages large and small. ABC News' The Note (certainly no partisan outfit) notes a very telling moment last night:

Last night, in the very New York Hilton ballroom in which the annual Inner Circle dinner is held, Bill and Hillary Clinton showed up to raise a little money for her Senate campaign. He spoke first and introduced her.

But before that, Democratic Party major fundraiser Alan Patricoff's para-stirring introduction of the spouse/FPOTUS included the applause-generating line "he's still our president," which required no explanation or qualification for the assembled Blue group.

Now, for those of you who see no liberal/Democratic bias in the media: imagine Hillary Clinton is elected President of the United States in 2008, and in 2009 at a massive Houston fundraiser for a GOP candidate, the Republican equivalent of Patricoff introduces George W. Bush and says about him "he's still our president." What kind of press coverage do you think that that would get?

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Re: Why Now?

By on 12.14.05 | 11:57AM

John: It's just my nasty suspicious mind that makes me wonder what they're trying to take our eyes off while we ponder the latest rant against Israel. They gain nothing from international opprobrium that comes with these statements, so there must be another reason for the timing. My guess is that they're trying to conceal something else with the minor kerfuffle that this is.

Is this the critical time for their nuke plans when they achieve some milestone they believe is irreversible? Is this the moment when they choose to do something bigger and worse in Iraq? Or is ol' Mahmoud trying to cover his political tush because he's in trouble for something at home? Or is there another event, which is entirely possible, that we aren't aware of and haven't forseen? I'm not going to lay awake tonight worrying. But I'm one of those people who do not believe in coincidences, and I wonder.

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Shocker

By on 12.14.05 | 11:43AM

Watching Mel Karmazin promote Howard Stern on satellite radio is like finding your defrocked priest selling condoms on a street corner.

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Re: Why Now?

By on 12.14.05 | 11:14AM

Jed: Do you have any reason to think Ahmadinejad doesn't mean every word he says? The nutty statements seemed to start almost as soon as he became president. I suspect he's simply speaking his mind. Why did the Mullahs pick a wild-eyed true-believer as president now? They must have needed someone whose fealty to the Islamic Republic wasn't in question, and felt that this was more important than presenting a friendly face to the world. If I'm right, they're feeling weak. Good.

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Today in History

By on 12.14.05 | 10:52AM

Permit me to take a moment to point out what a significant day the 14th of December is. For on this day:

-George Washington died at Mount Vernon (1799)

-Stock car racing was organized (1947)

-National Velvet opened (1944)

-Amundsen reached the South Pole (1911)

-USSR expelled from the League of Nations (1939)

AND...

-Our own dear leader RET was born. (Not going there)

Happy birthday, dear sir. And many, many more….

(Please feel free to leave your birthday greeting for RET in the comment section...)

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Get Off Me, Says Hillary

By on 12.14.05 | 10:45AM

At least, that's what the caption on the picture in this New York Post item should say. In the process of raising $600,000 for his wife's reelection bid, Bill Clinton amazingly admitted being somewhat of a bad husband:

"After all she's been through, I think I got off pretty lightly," Clinton said, an apparent reference to his tryst with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

I'll say. Or Gennifer. Or Paula. Or.. or...
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Why Now?

By on 12.14.05 | 10:17AM

That the Iranian kakistocracy wants to destroy Israel is not news. That they also are hell-bent on obtaining nuclear weapons and the achieving the ability to manufacture their own is also not any revelation. So why is Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president, making so loud a noise about Israel and the Holocost these days?

The timing is curious. Mohamed el-Baradei, head nuclear watchdog for the UN, says Iran may achieve its nuclear ambitions in six months or less. Most experts believe that underestimates, by at least a year, Iran's ability to arm itself with nukes. So why would Ahmadinejad be spouting off so loudly now?

Is he under political pressure at home? His relations with Iran's parliament are spotty, but they do what the mullahs tell them to, and so does he. Is this for foreign consumption? But why -- when Iran is interfering in Iraq -- would it want to draw more attention to itself?

Something is missing here.

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Profile in Courage Department

By on 12.14.05 | 9:49AM

North Dakota Democratic Sen. Byron Dorgan has returned $67,000 in political loot that came to him via sleazy Jack Abramoff. Posturing aside, will the gesture do Dorgan any good -- or merely draw attention to how easily he could be swayed? Reports the Washington Post: "Aides conceded that the senator did advocate for programs pushed by Abramoff's clients around the time he was accepting tens of thousands of dollars from associates and clients of the lobbyist."

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Pentagon At Large

By on 12.14.05 | 9:36AM

Lisa Myers and NBC have uncovered Pentagon investigations of anti-war protestors and potential threats to national security -- including a Quaker meeting. As if the left didn't already have enough to remind them of their glory days of the '60s, now they get to feel special since they're on the Defense Department's list. This comes on the heels of revelations about the government's contract with the Lincoln Group, paying for news stories to appear in Iraqi papers, and ethics investigations in Congress.

But Quakers? Maybe they were just wondering what on earth they discuss. Or maybe they're trying to find out just how they make that wholesome breakfast food.

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Slogging Toward Recess

By on 12.14.05 | 9:25AM

The Senate is barely back, and people are wondering what is going to get done before the long Christmas break.

It now appears that Sen. Chuck Grassley has complicated the tax bill to the point where a major piece of legislation is stalled out until February -- the Senate returns to full action on January 31.

Leadership staff is said to be frustrated by the lack of pacing, but perhaps this is all a good thing given what the alternatives might be.

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