The Spectacle Blog

Roe v. Wade Roundup

By on 1.22.10 | 2:27PM

Today is the anniversary of Roe v. Wade and the day of the March for Life in DC and elsewhere. In addition to commentary on our site by Ken Blackwell and G. Tracy Mehan, III, I recommend you read RedState's excellent statement on the right wing platform and the abortion issue:

The question does not and should not divide us along conservative/libertarian lines, for even the most libertarian among us must recognize the right of the state to prevent and punish the killing of innocent humans. And we renew our pledge today and every day to work to support candidates who will do everything in their power to someday bring about the day when Roe v. Wade joins Scott v. Sandford as an aberrant footnote to our nation’s great history.

On this day, we remember the nameless and the forgotten, and we lament our inability to even grasp the sorrow or the extent of their loss. Requiescat in pace.

And also this speech by the late Fr. Richard John Neuhaus from First Things:

The culture of death is an idea before it is a deed. I expect many of us here, perhaps most of us here, can remember when we were first encountered by the idea. For me, it was in the 1960s when I was pastor of a very poor, very black, inner city parish in Brooklyn, New York. I had read that week an article by Ashley Montagu of Princeton University on what he called “A Life Worth Living.” He listed the qualifications for a life worth living: good health, a stable family, economic security, educational opportunity, the prospect of a satisfying career to realize the fullness of one’s potential. These were among the measures of what was called “a life worth living.”

And I remember vividly, as though it were yesterday, looking out the next Sunday morning at the congregation of St. John the Evangelist and seeing all those older faces creased by hardship endured and injustice afflicted, and yet radiating hope undimmed and love unconquered. And I saw that day the younger faces of children deprived of most, if not all, of those qualifications on Prof. Montagu’s list. And it struck me then, like a bolt of lightning, a bolt of lightning that illuminated our moral and cultural moment, that Prof. Montagu and those of like mind believed that the people of St. John the Evangelist—people whom I knew and had come to love as people of faith and kindness and endurance and, by the grace of God, hope unvanquished—it struck me then that, by the criteria of the privileged and enlightened, none of these my people had a life worth living. In that moment, I knew that a great evil was afoot.

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