The Spectacle Blog

Jake Arrieta Throws No-Hitter (Could My NL Cy Young Prediction Come True?)

By on 8.30.15 | 11:25PM

Chicago Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta has just thrown a no-hitter against the Los Angeles Dodgers on ESPN Sunday Night Baseball. 

The Cubs won 2-0. The only offense they needed was a first inning home run by Kris Bryant. Arrieta struck out 12 batters including striking out the side in the 9th. It was Arrieta's 17th win of the season. He was 6-0 in the month of August. 

I should mention that I predicted Arrieta would win the NL Cy Young Award prior to the beginning of the season

Fundraisers Bail on Jeb!

By on 8.29.15 | 5:28PM

Politico is reporting that three of Jeb!’s fundraisers have quit the former Florida governor’s campaign. (One of these fundraisers carries the last name of Money — good grief, even Charles Dickens didn’t stoop to this.)

I can’t help but be amused by the guy who attempted to account for the departures on the basis of personality conflicts rather than on the obvious fact that candidate Jeb! is going nowhere. And going there very expensively. The latest polls put his support in the mid-single-digits. He currently resembles Alice in her shrinking phase.

This should come as no surprise as Jeb! has strategically positioned himself precisely 180 degrees out from the conservative Republican base on important issues, and as a campaigner he’s a bigger bore than W’s last dry well.

Thoughts on the 10th Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

By on 8.29.15 | 11:41AM

Today is the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina hitting land. While the storm is most closely associated with causing substantial destruction to New Orleans, the storm also did enormous damage in Alabama, Mississippi, parts of northern Florida as well as in the Bahamas and Cuba before striking the U.S. mainland. More than 1,800 people were killed as a result of Katrina while thousands of others were displaced. 

Al Arbour, R.I.P.

By on 8.28.15 | 6:24PM

Former NHL player and coach Al Arbour passed away today of Parkinson's and dementia. He was 82.

Arbour is best known for leading the New York Islanders to four consecutive Stanley Cup titles in the early 1980's. Those teams included the likes of Mike Bossy, Bryan Trottier and Billy Smith in goal. Those championship teams made Arbour the second winningest coach in NHL behind only Scotty Bowman.

Arbour also won four Stanley Cups as player - one with the Detroit Red Wings, one with the Chicago Blackhawks and two with the Toronto Maple Leafs. He would end his playing career with the St. Louis Blues where he would later become its coach before beginning his association with the Islanders in 1973.

In a classy gesture, Ted Nolan arranged for Arbour to come back and coach one more game for the Islanders in 2007. It would be his 1,500th game coaching the Islanders. Arbour became the oldest man in NHL history to win a game as a coach. 

Hillary Clinton: Republicans Want to Put Immigrants in ‘Boxcars’

By on 8.28.15 | 4:06PM

Very few people called Hillary Clinton out on her "Republicans are terrorists" comment from yesterday, so she appears to be doubling down on the inappropriate historical allusions. 

Today, though, instead of saying that Republicans were just like those guys in the Middle East who sell women into sex slavery, mutilate their genitals, gang rape them repeatedly and then sell their organs on the black market for cash, she noted that Republicans who oppose immigration reform are just like those Nazis who rounded up Europe's Jewish population in railroad cars bound for concentration camps.  

Clinton was asked by a reporter how she would handle the millions of illegal immigrants currently in the country. “Well, I’m glad you asked me that,” she responded. “Because I know that there are some on the other side who are seriously advocating to deport 11-12 million people who are working here.”

Who Is Really Crazy, ‘End the Fed,’ or the Fed Itself?

By on 8.28.15 | 3:54PM

Caleb Howe is reporting live from the Jackson Hole Summit, a major financial summit that is attracting the world's greatest thinkers on money and economics. Look for Caleb's posts throughout the weekend.

On Friday morning at the Jackson Hole Summit, Judy Shelton of the Sound Money Project and Atlas Network spoke on the subject of the gold standard and addressed the perception that people who even dare to mention it are lunatics or, as The American Spectator noted earlier today, Quixotic. Shelton's presentation focused in the main on the numbers and the policies. Dr. Shelton pointed out that the Fed can't seem to face up to a simple, apparent, easily understood fact: Their policies aren't working.

CEI’s Coalition Letter to Prevent New Bailouts of Fannie and Freddie

By on 8.28.15 | 1:50PM

As the Dodd-Frank “financial reform” celebrated its fifth anniversary this summer, just about every financial business—as well as many nonfinancial firms—have come under its thumb. This is true whether or not these companies had anything to do with the financial crisis.

Community banks and credit unions that had nothing to do with the subprime mortgage meltdown suddenly found that they couldn’t issue mortgages to creditworthy borrowers, thanks to provisions such as “qualified mortgage” and “qualified residential mortgage” mandates enforced by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the unaccountable new agency created by Dodd-Frank. Stable insurance companies such as MetLife that never faltered during the crisis and served policy holders for decades suddenly found themselves subject to bank-like capital requirements that even liberal Democrats like Sherrod Brown said was inappropriate.

Pure Gold From Jackson Hole

By on 8.28.15 | 12:08PM

The Jackson Hole Summit, billed as being "designed to challenge the policies of the Fed," opened this morning, to the sounds of Ray Charles and "We're Off To See The Wizard." The Wizard of Oz and the Yellow Brick Road are already a constant theme, with only two speakers under the group's belt. Taking place at the same time as the Fed Conference, introductory speaker Steve Lonegan made it clear this is not mere collocation but absolute defiance. The speakers and attendees here in Wyoming have differing points of view on policy prescriptions and possible solutions, but they are joined together in at least one single purpose: total condemnation of the Fed.

The Morning Spectacle: Best Buddies

By on 8.28.15 | 10:16AM

The weekend is so close you can taste it.

In Our Sights

House Majority leader John Boehner would do well to remember that people carry cell phones with them to donor dinners now. And the ones who don't don't necessarily have similar feelings about Ted Cruz

Speaking of, while Democrats are busily whipping votes to get the Iran deal past a Republican blockade in the Senate, Ted Cruz is taking matters into his own hands. The circus comes to town on September 9th, tentatively.

Darryl Dawkins, R.I.P.

By on 8.28.15 | 12:27AM

Former NBA player Darryl Dawkins died suddenly of a heart attack. He was 58.

Forty years ago, Dawkins was the talk of the NBA when the Philadelphia 76ers drafted him. It was the first time a high school player had ever been drafted by the league. Dawkins never lived up to expectations during his tenure with the 76ers and later the New Jersey Nets as well as brief stints with the Utah Jazz and the Detroit Pistons before ending his NBA career in 1989. He would play another decade in Europe.

Nicknamed "Chocolate Thunder" by Stevie Wonder, Dawkins is best remembered for not once, but twice breaking the backboard with his slam dunks in 1979. The NBA would then make that move illegal. 

After his playing career, Dawkins did some coaching with the ABA and the short-lived USBL before landing a gig with Lehigh Carbon Community College near his home in Allentown, Pennsylvania. 

Even if Dawkins didn't become one of the greatest NBA players, he sure was one of its memorable.

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