The Spectacle Blog

Ted Kennedy and Treason

By on 8.28.09 | 4:57PM

The late Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Massachusetts) was an incredibly powerful and influential politician whose impact on America will be felt forever but none of this changes the fact that he was a terrible person.

I feel for him in a way because he must have been tormented by all the tragedies in his family. All that pain and pressure surely got to him. This doesn't excuse his behavior. Plenty of other people have lived through hell without embracing recklessness as a lifestyle choice, but I understand how these devastating events must have twisted him.

May his tortured soul rest in peace.

With that said, why is hardly anybody talking about the credible allegations that the late senator may have committed a form of treason against the United States?

Connie Hair at Human Events spells it out in an article.

But Kennedy's private outreach to the KGB Soviet intelligence agency in attempts to undermine first President Jimmy Carter then President Ronald Reagan say as much as Chappaquiddick did about the man who appeared to have no moral restraints whatsoever on his personal pursuit of raw political power.

Documents found in Soviet archives after the fall of the Iron Curtain revealed a great deal about the character of Ted Kennedy. [...]

Tim Sebastian, a reporter for the London Times, found contemporaneous KGB documentation and published a story in February of 1992 of an additional communiqué by Ted Kennedy to the Soviet intelligence agency through Tunney.  Full text of the letter from the appendix of Paul Kengor's book The Crusader:  Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism can be found here

This time it was President Reagan in Kennedy's crosshairs as he attempted to arrange a meeting between Kennedy and General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Yuri Andropov.

Without diminishing the death of Mary Jo Kopechne, I suspect the fact that Sen. Kennedy caused her death will ultimately be regarded by historians as one of his lesser offenses. 

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