The Spectacle Blog

Simple Arrogance

That's what's driving everyone who is pushing the passage of the cap-and-trade bill, from Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, to Al Gore, to Nancy Pelosi, to the president.

By on 6.26.09 | 4:54PM

That's what's driving everyone who is pushing the passage of the cap-and-trade bill, from Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, to Al Gore, to Nancy Pelosi, to the president. Witness this from Myron Ebell, of the Competitive Enterprise Institute:

For those not able to watch the circus on the House, the last fifteen minutes have been priceless. Rep. Louie Gohmert made a parliamentary enquiry about where he could find a copy of the 309 pages that were added to the bill at 2:49 AM. The chairman hemmed and hawed and finally said that she didn’t know. Then Rep. Joe Barton made a parliamentary enquiry about whether there was a rule of the House that a copy of the bill on the floor had to be available. The chairman said that she was not aware of such a rule.

Then after some more attempts to make enquiries about where a copy of the 309 pages could be consulted, Rep. Edward Markey disdainfully explained to his inferiors that a copy was in plain sight at the Clerk’s desk and was available on the web site. Then Rep. Barton pointed out that the copy available at the desk was the 1201 pages and a separate pile with the 309 pages of which the clerk was trying to insert the various pieces into their correct places in the 1201 pages. He inquired whether this was an official copy. The chair said that yes “in effect” it was. Hundreds of members rushed to the Clerk’s desk to read the 309 pages.

No, I made that up. Vote first, find out what you’ve voted on later.

And in a report today by the Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer, there's this from Obama's Energy Secretary, Steven Chu:

Everyone agrees this cap-and-trade concept will lead to higher electric bills and gasoline prices. How much varies by source.

Chu said recent studies by two agencies - the Congressional Budget Office and the Environmental Protection Agency - equated the extra cost to about $240 a year for the typical family.

"This is not a lot of money," he said.

These estimates are widely challenged, but even if they are right, I wonder if -- since $240 isn't a lot of money -- the secretary wouldn't mind covering my vehicle fuel next month?

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