The Spectacle Blog

There They Go Again

By on 11.5.05 | 7:12AM

Anyone reading this blog appreciates the freedom of speech and of the press the Internet facilitates. Without it, we'd be the rapid exchange of news and views that now propel American politics would be slowed considerably. And, of course, the Turtle Bay crime family wants a nose under the tent, eyeing the means to limit that freedom.

In today's WaPo, Ol' Kofi tells us just why we shouldn't be concerned about the UN's efforts to take control of the Internet. That's the farthest thing from their minds, sayeth he. But the money quote is:

"Governance of matters related to the Internet, such as spam and cybercrime, is being dealt with in a dispersed and fragmented manner, while the Internet's infrastructure has been managed in an informal but effective collaboration among private businesses, civil society and the academic and technical communities. But developing countries find it difficult to follow all these processes and feel left out of Internet governance structures." (NB: the vast majority of "developing countries" are governed by dictators and despots who have every interest in reducing freedom.)

"The United States deserves our thanks for having developed the Internet and made it available to the world. For historical reasons, the United States has the ultimate authority over some of the Internet's core resources. It is an authority that many say should be shared with the international community. The United States, which has exercised its oversight responsibilities fairly and honorably, recognizes that other governments have legitimate public policy and sovereignty concerns, and that efforts to make the governance arrangements more international should continue." In UN parlance, that's about the same as the theme song to "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" -- "So long and thanks for all the fish."

Sure, paragons of free speech, religion and the press such as Communist China have legitimate public policy concerns, such as how best to restrict the free flow of information to and among its people. Any part of the governance of the Internet we surrender to the UN is surrendered to nations such as China, who have every reason to undermine the freedom it gives us. Just say no to any UN meddling in the Internet, Mr. President. Maybe something stronger than "no" is in order this time.

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