Tracy Robinson

Tracy Robinson is a 2004 graduate of the George Mason University School of Law.

A Newdow Is Dawning

 

Other than the Washington Post editorial board, few in America were pleased by yesterday’s Supreme Court ruling in Elk Grove Unified School District v. Newdow, better known as the Pledge of Allegiance case. The opinion for the Court did not address the constitutionality of the Pledge, but rather held that the plaintiff, Michael Newdow, lacked […]

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Clinton Connectivity

 

In his 1997 State of the Union speech, President Clinton returned to one of his favorite themes — education. In order to ensure that “Americans have the best education in the world,” he asked Congress to “work together to meet these three goals”: “Every eight-year-old must be able to read. Every 12-year-old must be able […]

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Bork’s Law

 

Over the last few years, the U.S. Supreme Court increasingly has looked to foreign court rulings for guidance on American constitutional questions. Two years ago in Atkins v. Virginia, the Court referred to the opinion of the “world community” to help demonstrate that a “social and professional consensus” had developed against death sentences for convicted […]

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A Renegade Ruling

 

With its ruling yesterday in Southwest Voter Registration Education Project v. Shelley — the California recall election case — the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals once again demonstrated why it is overruled so frequently. In granting the voting rights group’s request for an injunction to postpone next month’s special election until March, the court completely […]

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Internet Howie

 

Supporters of newly anointed Democratic frontrunner Howard Dean like to point out that he’s no ordinary politician. He’s a doctor, he opposed the recent war in Iraq, and he has been tagged by the press as a fiscal conservative who angered politicians in both parties during his time as governor of Vermont. The Washington Post […]

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Settled Law

 

Although conservative activists tried to save face this week by claiming victory in the battle against racial preferences with the ruling in Gratz v. Bollinger, it was hard to deny that they lost the war in the companion case, Grutter v. Bollinger. In Gratz, the Supreme Court struck down the University of Michigan’s infamous undergraduate […]

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Death Penalty Weasels

 

Conventional wisdom says that if any crime deserves the death penalty, last month’s sniper shooting spree in the Washington, D.C. area does. Ten were killed, three were wounded, and millions in the region were terrorized for three solid weeks. The calculated killings are so universally seen as horrendous that even long-time death penalty opponents are […]

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Voting Error

 

“Here we go again!” media outlets gleefully chirped last week as they got to report another election breakdown in Florida. Involving a familiar cast of characters, the story line was almost too perfect. Numerous polling places failed to open on time, resulting in some voters — including Democratic gubernatorial primary candidate Janet Reno — being […]

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You Can’t Lick ‘Em

 

Last Monday, postage rates went up — again. In the third rate-hike since 1999, stamps for first-class letters went up nearly 9 percent, from 34 to 37 cents, and the rates for postcards, priority mail, and packages rose as well. Just why do we need another increase now? The U.S. Postal Service’s central command said […]

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Last Gasp for the Death Penalty

 

For decades, a reliable minority of Supreme Court justices has dreamt of outlawing the death penalty. So far, however, anti-death penalty activists have had to take comfort in limited victories at the state level (such as the recent moratorium in Illinois) along with ever-increasing restrictions declared by the Supreme Court. Last Thursday’s ruling in Atkins […]

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