Robert T. McLean

Robert T. McLean is a Research Associate at the Center for Security Policy in Washington, D.C.

The Battle for India

 

With the conflicts and disorder of the Middle East consuming the attention of much of the civilized world, there is yet another battle raging on — though few in the West are even slightly aware of its potential consequences or that it is even taking place. This one involves the world’s great powers and will […]

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Did Bush Overreach?

 

It is common now to charge that the invasion of Iraq was a moment where America’s ambitions surpassed its abilities. Various articles have surfaced of late declaring that even President George W. Bush may be grasping the folly of his ways. A great deal of attention earlier this month focused on a Time magazine cover […]

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A Deal Down Under

 

There has been much speculation in Australia about a secret deal to transfer power from current Prime Minister John Howard to his deputy, Peter Costello, before next year’s parliamentary elections. On July 6, the Associated Press reported that Howard now denies that such a deal has been struck. Whether a deal is in the works […]

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The Return of the Non-Aligned Movement

 

Set against the backdrop of decolonization and an international environment split between Cold War superpowers, both weak and newly independent states formed a bloc that became known as the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM). While essentially contradictory from its inception, it was not until the collapse of the U.S.S.R. and the Warsaw Pact that NAM became largely […]

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Fulton in Moscow

 

Relations between the United States and Russia have come under close examination from a number of quarters as of late. The recent anniversaries of the Allied victory in Europe and Winston Churchill’s famous “Iron Curtain” speech provided the kindling for the fire set by Vice President Dick Cheney’s criticisms of Russia during his visit earlier […]

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From Russia With Arms

 

WASHINGTON — The Cold War may be over, but relations between the United States and Russia are slowly begging to freeze over once again. Nowhere has this become more evident than in our dealings with the Islamic Republic of Iran. While the United States and its European allies remain committed to ensuring that Tehran will […]

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Change Is Slow at Turtle Bay

 

Kofi Annan’s tenure at the United Nations is soon mercifully coming to an end. Those hopeful for genuine reform of the troubled body, however, should not hold their breath. The United States was recently one of only four countries out of the 191-member General Assembly to vote against the creation of a Human Rights Council […]

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Bullish on Baghdad

 

WASHINGTON — A key to success in Iraq will be the ability of the Iraqi people and coalition members to transform the country’s economy from a state of ruin to a model for prosperity in the Middle East. Iraqis with jobs and opportunities are less likely to join or sympathize with terrorist and insurgent efforts, […]

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The Chinese Lecture on Human Rights

 

It is that time of year again when all of a sudden Beijing is concerned with human rights. The Information Office of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China issued a report on March 9 entitled “The Human Rights Record of the United States in 2005.” This is a yearly ritual conducted by […]

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The Battle for Basra

 

The proverbial library of successful counter-insurgencies — a woefully small collection — is dominated by the near-legendary campaigns of the British, including those carried out in Malaya, Aden, and Oman. Until recently, some observers thought it entirely possible that the British effort in southern Iraq would join this catalog of battlefield achievements. Those hopes — […]

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