Ralph R. Reiland

Ralph R. Reiland is an associate professor of economics at Robert Morris University and a columnist with the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

Devils and the Anti-Capitalists

 

People believe some funny stuff — some of it religious, some of it about economics. A long-running idea in the Catholic Church, for instance, says the devil can be scared off by the sight of the cross or a medal of St. Benedict. American historian Henry Osburn Taylor (1856-1941) wrote of the dying moments of […]

Continue Reading

Holiday Correctness

 

I didn’t even know it was a problem, but it appears that some of the politically correct people Down Under have found a way to stop Santa Clauses from making hookers feel bad. According to a spokesperson for Westoff, a recruiting and training company that has supplied thousands of Santas across Australia for over four […]

Continue Reading

2016: Positive Prognosis?

 

As luck would have it, we made it through another year without a successful energy grid attack by the medieval fundamentalists or Russian antagonists who are seeking to paralyze America into darkness and powerlessness.  On October 15, 2015, U.S. law enforcement officials publicly revealed information on hack attempts at a national conference of American energy […]

Continue Reading

Eros and Ideology

 

I’ve seen how an increasingly intolerant and muzzling form of political correctness has invaded nearly every aspect of American life. But I was still surprised recently to see how political orthodoxy was being applied to some of the most private and intimate aspects of personal behavior. Browsing the magazine section in a bookstore, I glanced […]

Continue Reading

Yes, the End Is Near

 

I hadn’t seen this friend for years when I ran into him recently at the mall. “The end is near,” was the first thing he said. I didn’t know if he was talking about ISIS or if he thought we’re all going to float away due to a planetary heating that’s irreversible and catastrophic. Happily, he […]

Continue Reading

Too Brittle for School

 

One way I can tell I’m getting old, aside from it taking more time to get my socks on in the morning, is that my ideas might seem to some to be outmoded or, as I’ve been more flippantly described recently by a business friend, “old school.” I’ve always thought, for example, that a central […]

Continue Reading

Our Floundering Judicial System

 

“Unfairly targeted” and “disproportionately punished” appears to be the final rallying cry of the Obama administration — sort of like a grand finale after a prolonged series of duds. As the administration’s attempted vote-solidifying storyline goes, America’s cops are unduly targeting communities that are disproportionately populated by members of the nation’s most historically oppressed constituency, […]

Continue Reading

Price and Demand: Cars and Labor

 

A basic principle from Economics-101 is that the downward sloping demand curve — the graph showing an inverse relationship between the price of something and the amount that people are willing and able to buy at that given price — works at all income levels and in both the market for goods and services and […]

Continue Reading

Papalnomics — Not So Infallible

 

Here’s a quick question I received via email from a reader who said I was too negative in one of my columns about President Obama’s economic record: “Does the economics of Pope Francis better match the economic ideology of Barack Obama or Donald Trump?” Well, regarding a life of work and spending, let’s start with […]

Continue Reading

So Much for This Year’s Labor Day

 

“Of course, nothing helps families make ends meet like higher wages,” President Barack Obama said in his State of the Union address on Jan. 20, 2015. But rather than those higher wages being produced in the free market by way of higher productivity, better education, improvements in products and services, higher sales volumes, better efficiencies, […]

Continue Reading