Quin Hillyer

Quin Hillyer is a senior editor of The American Spectator. Follow him on Twitter @Quin Hillyer, or at his website, QuinHillyer.com.

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You Wanted Trump, You’ve Got Him

 

This should be the last time I write against Donald Trump all year. Okay, all you conservatives who supported Donald Trump before he officially became the Republican Party’s official nominee last night: Now, you own him. He’s all yours. When he again spouts asinine or even vicious nonsense — like belittling tortured POWs from Vietnam, […]

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Trump, a Loser, Stiffs the ‘Ordinary Joe’

 

South Carolinians ought to see through Donald Trump’s pose as a winner to recognize him as a repeated failure, and should ignore his pretense as a populist to see his long record of leaving ordinary Americans in the lurch. Trump won’t fight for American voters; he fights only for himself, and he loses more than […]

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Santorum Could Trample Trump

 

With just two major Republican debates remaining before the Iowa presidential caucuses, Donald Trump has been remarkably lucky. The only major candidate who could actually inflict lasting harm on the vulgar poster child for inherited wealth, and the only one who could readily attract and hold some of Trump’s blue collar constituency, is the only […]

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How Boehner Got His Groove On

 

As John Boehner this week steps down as Speaker of the House, it’s worth telling the never-reported tale of how Boehner first got on the House Republican leadership track in the first place. The story shows, in microcosm, both Boehner’s remarkable skill-set and his oft-infuriating wheeler-dealer nature. Let’s start the story sort of in the […]

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And Now Bozell

 

There was a time, back in the early 1960s, when L. Brent Bozell Jr. quite literally defined the conservative conscience. It is long past time that Bozell receive his due. It is therefore great news that one of the first books published by ISI Books this year was Living on Fire: The Life of L. […]

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Surely Heaven Is Now in Session

 

Jeremiah Denton was the greatest American I ever personally knew. When the former admiral, prisoner of war, and U.S. senator died on Friday at 89, America lost not just a profoundly brave man but a profoundly good one. Most readers know the basics of his story as a POW: shot down and badly wounded; tortured […]

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Audible and Admirable From Adelphi to Arlington

 

An American hero—a real hero, by old standards, before the word “hero” became overused—was buried at Arlington National Cemetery on January 17. Those who celebrated the life of Lt. Col. (Ret.) Robert James Eitel paid homage to the best of what this nation produces. [[{“type”:”media”,”view_mode”:”media_large”,”fid”:”94028″,”attributes”:{“alt”:””,”class”:”media-image”,”height”:”315″,”style”:”float: right;”,”typeof”:”foaf:Image”,”width”:”250″}}]]Eitel was born in New Jersey in 1930, seven years […]

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Aaron Fails to Understand Religious Liberty

 

Aaron makes a dangerous argument, and reaches a dangerous conclusion, in attacking Arizona’s religious-liberty bill and criticizing Natalie’s post explaining and partially defending it. To take Aaron’s odd logic to an inevitable conclusion, if government can force a vendor (baker, photographer, whatever) to participate (by providing a service) in a ceremony that violates his religious […]

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Ray Hartwell, in Memoriam

 

I received the word yesterday, through a mutual friend; today, J. Christian Adams does a nice job paying tribute. Our friend, and regular AmSpec contributor, Ray Hartwell, died Friday evening at an all-too-young 66, while working out on a treadmill in his new hometown in Alabama. A physician happened to be on the treadmill right […]

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Belabored Laborers at Labor

 

Yesterday at NRO I reported, after much investigation, that a host of shenanigans by the Obamite political troops at the Labor Department were destroying morale there and ill serving the public. Poetry contests at OSHA. Glossy, expensive, politically charged posters in every elevator. Pressure to vote in a religious-themed poll. Big outside contracts to promote […]

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