Paul Beston

Paul Beston is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal.

Farewell to Frazier

 

Great fighters are supposed to have something called “heart,” but it’s not easy to understand where it comes from or what its limits are. In Joe Frazier‘s case, it came from a rural upbringing replete with bootleg whiskey, one-armed fathers, and enough poverty and mysticism to keep a stable of Delta bluesmen busy. As for […]

Continue Reading

Advice for Eulogists

 

Death is final, but it leaves you with the same old questions of form and content. What to say, what mood to strike? And how to deliver — a question not just of style but composure. If you can’t get through it, nothing else will matter. The key to that part, an old friend offers, […]

Continue Reading

The Boss Man Goeth

 

For the first time in nearly four decades, baseball will welcome Opening Day without the presence of George Steinbrenner — neither front and center, as he was for most of his tenure as owner of the New York Yankees, nor behind the scenes, as he was during his late illness and two suspensions from the […]

Continue Reading

Switching Off, Switching On

 

Every year after the Super Bowl, I pull the plug on sports. Football is over, baseball has yet to start, and I don’t much care about other sports except boxing, which is not a game and has no season, anyway. I can never resist a plunge into melancholy, not because the games are over but […]

Continue Reading

Rent

 

In this age of technological solutions for most things, of redundant networks and backup files, there is still no contingency plan for the individual — man or woman — who splits the seat of a pair of pants while at work or otherwise out in the world. The popular saying has it that when we […]

Continue Reading

Howl

 

The Wolfman remake, directed by Joe Johnston and starring Benicio del Toro, Anthony Hopkins, Emily Blunt, and Hugo Weaving, is a mostly faithful and sometimes worthy update of the original, 1941’s Universal classic starring Lon Chaney, Jr. and Claude Rains. The move alters a number of things, but the basic story is the same: Lawrence […]

Continue Reading

Cosmetic Improvements

 

For as long as I can remember, I’ve watched women arrive in public places and make themselves up. No doubt they do this out of necessity — they’re pressed for time — but it always seems as if they’re parading the secrets of their art, like magicians carrying rabbits and top hats around in open […]

Continue Reading

Empty Trenches

 

Henry Allingham and Harry Patch, two of the three surviving British veterans of the First World War and the last two who saw action in the trenches of the Western front, died within a week of one another last month. Allingham was 113 and considered by some estimates the world’s oldest man. Patch was a spry […]

Continue Reading

Many Moons Ago

 

On the 40th anniversary of the moon landing, it’s tempting to emulate William F. Buckley, who was asked how he would describe the event. “With silence,” Buckley said. This defining human achievement soon had the effect of making such awe harder to come by. Those who grew up after Neil Armstrong stepped onto the lunar […]

Continue Reading

Requiem for the Thin Man


 

For devotees of an always-troubled sport, Alexis Arguello‘s death on July 1 at 57 brought back memories of the elegant boxing master of the 1970s and early 1980s. It also reminded me of the conversation I had with him at Graziano’s Inn in Canastota, New York, during the International Boxing Hall of Fame’s June 2004 […]

Continue Reading