Patrick O’Hannigan

Patrick O’Hannigan is a writer in North Carolina.

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Martyrdom Was Ours First

 

The New York Times waited two days. On the morning of July 26, 84-year-old Fr. Jacques Hamel was murdered while celebrating Mass when armed Islamists attacked his Catholic parish in Saint Etienne du Rouvray, France. Two days later, the New York Times published an essay by a journalist who hopes that Pope Francis can persuade […]

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Shut Up! What’s Happened To Argument?

 

If disagreement is no longer tolerated, making one’s case is the last thing required. Argument has fallen on hard times. That might seem an odd thing to say in an election year roiled by agitation over social questions and the continuing presence of candidates whom political strategists had thought would go away by now. Wouldn’t […]

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Mostly Dead All Day: What’s Happened to Argument?

 

Argument has fallen on hard times. That might seem an odd thing to say in an election year roiled by agitation over social questions and the continuing presence of candidates whom political strategists had thought would go away by now. Wouldn’t argument have to be in the air when musicians cancel North Carolina shows in […]

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The End of Christian America?

 

Duke Divinity School professor Norman Wirzba wrote recently about why he thinks we ought to declare the end of “Christian America.” A link to that essay was emailed to me by a friend who thought it was an excellent read, but I was underwhelmed by the work. Wirzba opened with a basic grammatical error, and […]

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Three Cheers for the Surveyor

 

Very few books can be summarized as “social science by a prayerful engineer wearing a hauberk,” but John Gravino’s The Immoral Landscape (of the New Atheism) stands tall as a paperback fitting that description. Gravino used the CreateSpace platform to publish a defense of “biblical moral psychology” aimed at professional atheists and the far larger […]

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Blonde Ambition Strikes Again

 

At least one reader on a news aggregator website for conservatives recently sniffed that anyone who hates as much as Ann Coulter does should not wear a cross in public. What made that reader’s simmering disapproval boil over was Coulter’s quip to a radio host about how she hates Carly Fiorina with “the hot, hot […]

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When a Poet Needs a SWAT Team

 

Conor Friedersdorf of the Atlantic recently took a poet to task because that poet had written to an advice columnist wondering whether he had any right to write. The anonymous supplicant was more conflicted than Hamlet, but less eloquent. “I am a white, male poet,” he said, “a white, male poet who is aware of […]

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Cruz Control

 

Dear journalists: May I have a public word with you, especially if you edit the Raleigh News and Observer? You probably take a dim view of unsolicited advice from a junior member of the guild, but I think I can save you some grief in the run-up to next year’s presidential election, with an assist […]

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Reframing Perspectives on the March for Life

 

Canadian essayist David Warren is a man with whom I seldom disagree. Imagine my surprise on reading his depressing assessment of the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. Warren’s “Marching to Nowhere” starts strongly, with a withering reminder of when a Representative from my state wrapped herself in discretion without having first tried valor. […]

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Pope Francis Needs Our Help

 

Writing in Al Jazeera America, a Ph.D. student in “religion and critical thought” at Brown University recently declared 2014 “the year of Pope Francis.” Her sentiment is shared by other writers. What made her article interesting was the “pull quote” featured in its layout. Oversize type made the point that “Pope Francis’ approval ratings remain […]

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