Kevin Glass

Kevin Glass is a guest-blogger for The Spectacle. 

Small Steps Toward a Better Tax Code

 

Details have leaked out about the tax deal that Republican members of the deficit Supercommittee offered to Democrats. Led by Sen. Toomey (Penn.), the GOP takes aim at itemized deductions, broadening the base while lowering the rates in a scaled-down form of some plans we’ve seen from the Simpson-Bowles commission, Rep. Ryan and GOP contenders. […]

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The Only Thing Worse Than Obamacare is Obamacare Without A Mandate

 

The word on the AP wire is that, if the Supreme Court considers Obamacare’s mandate severable and unconstitutional, the Obama Administration will go forward with implementation as planned. But privately, there’s a Plan B: If the court strikes down the law’s unpopular linchpin — the so-called individual mandate requiring most Americans to carry health insurance […]

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Obama “Can’t Wait” to Target Waste, Fraud and Abuse in Health Entitlements

 

In the latest step for his “We Can’t Wait” executive-authority initiative, President Obama is targeting “waste, fraud and abuse” in Medicare and Medicaid in an attempt to cut spending and woo voters. The White House is launching pilot programs intended to further cut waste and fraud in the giant Medicare and Medicaid entitlement programs. The […]

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Supercommittee Would Rather Change the Rules Than Make Budget Cuts

 

The budget-cutting “Supercommittee” formed in the wake of August’s debt ceiling deal that has been tasked with finding meaningful austerity measures to put the U.S. government on a track to fiscal balance has, to no one’s surprise, not come close to anything significant. Sen. Toomey recently floated the idea that Congress could change the rules […]

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As Supercommittee Faces Failure, Both Parties Have to Deal With Defense Cuts

 

While Democrats don’t often concern themselves with too much government spending, the one place you often see consternation is in defense spending. As a percentage of federal spending, defense has constituted around 20 percent of total spending, and is one of the largest (often the largest) single categorical source of spending. Regardless, we conservatives typically […]

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It’s About More than Marginal Tax Rates

 

The U.S. already has a very progressive tax code and has actually gotten more progressive over the course of the Bush years. Nonetheless, one of the principles (if they have any at all) of Occupy Wall Street is that the rich and super-rich don’t pay enough in taxes, and that money should then be used […]

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The Deficit Is Not Just an Arithmetic Problem

 

As the SuperCommittee heads toward an inevitable train wreck (the deadline is soon, and there’s been no significant movement), the hand-wringing over who to blame has started. And, predictably, Politico comes rushing to the defense of Democrats, claiming that Republicans need an “arithmetic lesson.” [T]he data highlights what’s also become the great arithmetic lesson for […]

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The D.C. Council’s Unconstitutional Anti-Bullying Bill

 

Bullying is an everpresent issue that faces American kids. But recently, a spate of anti-bullying fever has swept through the nation’s legislators. In New Jersey, Missouri, Michigan, California and other states, legislatures are enacting harsh anti-bullying laws in hopes of curbing the effect on public schoolkids. Now, the D.C. city council is considering a very […]

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Feds Are On the Hook for Student Loan Bubble

 

Total student loan debt continues to skyrocket even as other kinds of consumer debt are slowly coming down in the wake of the financial crisis. It continues to get more expensive to go to college, students are leaving with a lot more debt, and they’re graduating with degrees less likely to see a payoff. Oh, […]

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Brick-and-Mortar Retailers Take the Fight to Amazon

 

Amazon.com has been targeted by state legislatures across the country as a source of potential tax revenue, and there’s now a lawsuit in Indiana being filed by brick-and-mortar retailers against the state because they have chosen not to go this route. Shopping mall giant Simon Property Group sued the Indiana Department of Revenue on Thursday […]

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