Jonathan Aitken

Jonathan Aitken, The American Spectator‘s High Spirits columnist, is most recently author of John Newton: From Disgrace to Amazing Grace (Crossway Books). His biographies include Charles W. Colson: A Life Redeemed (Doubleday) and Nixon: A Life, now available in a new paperback edition (Regnery).

India’s Jekyll and Hyde

 

This year’s election in India, a marvel of modern democracy with 815 million eligible voters going to the polls, has the potential to change the country for the better economically, and for the worse spiritually. Simmering just beneath the surface of the campaign lurks a real prospect of religious subjugation, persecution of minority groups, and […]

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He Maketh Wars to Cease

 

Anglican leadership? The phrase has had the ring of an oxymoron in recent years. From the fractious and predominantly liberal Episcopalians in America to the militantly conservative churches of Africa, the 80 million worshippers in the world’s second-largest Christian denomination have long been rent asunder. They split on women bishops, same-sex marriages, ancient versus modern […]

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None of Our Business?

 

Why has the Western world, and its churches in particular, been so slow to wake up and do something about one of the greatest international human rights tragedies of the 21st century? This is the murderous persecution of tens of thousands of Christians across the Middle East. In the last three years it has intensified […]

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More Things Wrought By Prayer

 

ABSENT FROM THIS column all summer, I have been walking, in the words of the 23rd Psalm, “through the valley of the shadow of death.” It has been both a dreadful and a wonderful experience. The ancient power of prayer, allied with 21st-century neurosurgery, played its part in this particular walk. The heroine, also the […]

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A Panoply of Beauties

 

Margaret Thatcher’s funeral was a memorable, moving, and magnificent occasion. Obsequies for great statesmen can be tightrope walks across the divide between the temporal and the eternal. There are many conflicting pressures: past controversies, political sycophancy, private grief, and religious ritual. But this send-off produced a near perfect mixture of history and spirituality, high ceremonial […]

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We Have Her Example

 

The greatness of Margaret Thatcher is readily apparent to those who honor the conservative principles by which she lived. She believed in rolling back the power of the state, allowing free enterprise to flourish, breaking the stranglehold of organized labor unions, upholding the rule of law, shifting the middle ground of the postwar political consensus, […]

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The CEO of Canterbury

 

While all eyes have been on Rome in recent weeks for the election of a new pope, the world’s third-largest Christian denomination has enthroned a new archbishop of Canterbury. He is Justin Welby, the global leader of 90 million Anglicans. An original and unexpected choice for the most recognizable top job in the Protestant churches, […]

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An Oasis of Tolerance

 

TIMES ARE TOUGH for Christian communities in the Middle East. They are being slaughtered in Syria, persecuted in Iraq and Iran, bullied in Egypt, and frightened by the rising tide of militant Islam in almost every Arab country. But there is one exception to this depressing trend. It is a Gulf state where the authorities have […]

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Black Punches Back

 

Coming back from death—real death—has only happened once. Its political equivalent has been almost as rare. Yet as 2013 gets under way, recent evidence highlights two examples of this phenomenon: Richard Nixon and Conrad Black. Last month marked the 100th anniversary of Nixon’s birth. Most of the centenary reassessments of his career must surely have brought […]

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At Work and at Prayer

 

WE ARE APPROACHING the season of New Year’s resolutions. Alas, for me and many others this ritual is embarrassingly like the old joke that compares keeping the commandments to taking an examination paper: “Ten are set but only four need be attempted.” Even so the endeavour of making resolutions is usually worthwhile. Less enduring, perhaps, […]

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