John H. Fund

John H. Fund is a senior editor of The American Spectator and author of the Stealing Elections (Encounter Books).

Republicans Can Learn a Lot From Burger King’s Move to Canada

 

  The merger of U.S. hamburger giant Burger King with Tim Horton’s, Canada’s favorite coffee shop, will create the world’s third largest “fast food” company with a total of 18,000 restaurants in over 100 countries. It is also a piercing wake-up call for the U.S. because the new company will make its global headquarters in […]

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North Colorado?

 

AMERICANS HAVE BEEN living in a union of 50 states for over half a century now, ever since Hawaii and Alaska were added to the flag. But that hasn’t stopped some from trying to change that number by breaking away from existing states, and forming new ones, when they feel excluded from the political process. […]

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Don’t Save Detroit — Sell It

 

IN THE 1983 movie Dr. Detroit, the flamboyant lead character goes on a rampage warning of trouble to come. “I am talking about scorched earth, no survival, wholesale destruction…body-bags and fire!” he yells. That’s pretty much what has happened to Detroit over the last three decades.  Its population has shrunk by half to below 700,000. […]

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Way Beyond the Lemonade Stand

 

A paintball playing field, a lawn-care business, a pet-grooming service, pre-mixed jars of ingredients for making pastries, a smoothie store in a school cafeteria, and an online jewelry collection: All of these businesses were founded by teenage entrepreneurs who showed up at an April dinner in New York honoring the 25th anniversary of the Network […]

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The Great Train Robbery

 

NOTHING FITS the Obama administration’s economic project better than high-speed rail. It’s based on visions of a utopian future, employs gobs of union labor in its construction, can be used to reward political allies and donors, and makes use of analysts eager to churn out dubious studies justifying it on economic grounds. Call it Solyndra […]

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Term Limits Are Back

 

TERM LIMITS were all the rage in the 1990s, when 21 states limited the terms of their own members of Congress by popular vote. The movement was close to reaching a tipping point at which enough members of Congress would have been covered by term limits that it’s likely they would have voted for such […]

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We’re Picking Up Good Migrations

 

If you run a high-tax, budget-busting state, the embarrassing government statistics you fear the most are probably the migratory data numbers put out by the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Census Bureau. The figures show the number of people moving into and out of every county and state in the nation, along with their income […]

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Fraud With Implications

 

WE MAY BE ON THE BRINK of repeating the 2000 Florida election debacle—but this time in several states, with allegations of voter fraud and manipulation of voting machines added to the generalized chaos that sent the Bush-Gore race into overtime. With its hanging chads, butterfly ballots, and U.S. Supreme Court intervention, the Florida fiasco forced […]

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California Demon

 

THE LATEST UNEMPLOYMENT NUMBERS show the economic recovery stalling. But as weak as the national economy is, it’s nothing compared to the condition of some states whose policies are guaranteed to scare away jobs and investment. Call it the European Disease: Run up spending and debt, raise taxes in the name of balancing the budget, […]

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The One Percenters’ Fortress City

 

In the dystopian blockbuster movie The Hunger Games, a restless and resentful population in the nation of Panem is controlled by the wealthy and powerful who reside in the fortress city of Capitol. Is that all that different from today’s United States, where wealth and power seem increasingly to gravitate toward the Beltway and its […]

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