Jackson Adams

Jackson Adams is an editorial intern at The American Spectator, a former teacher, ski instructor, and political campaigner, and a graduate of Theology from the University of Oxford.

Allen West: In Search of Giants

 

Former Rep. Allen West has no plans to run for reelection — but he wants to help conservative minorities and military veterans win seats in Congress. “I asked myself, ‘How can I help the next generation of minority conservatives?’” West told TAS in an interview. “I could go back and try to get back into Congress. […]

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“The Bible’s” True Grit

 

“Gritty” continues to characterize The Bible, as the third installment of the History Channel series makes more sacrifices on the altar of ratings stunts. Firstly, in order to make the Babylonian sack of Jerusalem as bloody and violent as possible, the episode condensed the Bible’s reported three sacks into one, leaving out that the more significant exodus actually included the King of Judah, Jehoiachim, who lived […]

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HABEMUS PAPAM: Historic Firsts

 

The first Pope from the New World comes from Argentina, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio. The first Pope from the Society of Jesus, he is taking the name Francis, an historic first which nevertheless has a long tradition: St. Francis of Assisi (founder of the Franciscan order in the 12th Century) and St. Francis Xavier (one of the first […]

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The Bible‘s Bad Intentions

 

The second installment of The Bible fared somewhat better in terms of accuracy this week. I at least observed no grievous misrepresentations, barring a significant shortening of the Samson and Delilah story that took away the original’s mysterious charm — in the actual story Samson tells Delilah three different ways to lose his strength that prove false before giving her the […]

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The Bible: Beyond the Pale

 

Ever since medieval mystery plays, the Bible has offered a lucrative playground for show business. The Good Book’s engrossing stories and a guaranteed audience provide the ingredients of success for a profession wedded to ratings. Believers rightly approach these attempts with trepidation. After all, not a little Christian blood has been spilled over the correctness […]

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Where the Senate Does its Business

 

As earlier noted, an open rift is appearing in the Senate GOP between the filibustering Rand Paul (and Co.) and the dining John McCain (and Co.). Whereas Paul took the battle to the Senate floor and from there via C-SPAN to the American people, the others went to dinner with the president.  How these two arms of what is […]

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Sequestration Shenanigans

 

As the White House closes for tours, Bankrupting America presents a penny jar.  

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He Loves EU…He Loves EU Not

 

Becoming Europe: Economic Decline, Culture, and How America Can Avoid a European FutureBy Samuel Gregg(Encounter Books, 363 pages, $25.99) “Europe” is a concept Europeans are still getting used to. It should not, therefore, be surprising that it took a book written primarily for Americans to determine the sort of morass into which Western European social […]

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Let’s Go Dutch

 

The sequester program of spending cuts constitutes the least friendly method of cutting. Instead of involving a reflective process and a proverbial scalpel, it operates like a penalty and with an axe. Few who push for cuts should be thrilled about it. It therefore helps that alternatives are floating around, such as the Mercatus Center’s […]

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Bernanke Says State and Local Budgets Seem Stable UPDATED

 

Ben Bernanke claimed that state and local government budgets seem to have stabilized, in response to a question by New York Rep. Gregory Meeks about why the economy lost 600,000 public sector jobs. Meeks claimed this would be the equivalent of one percent of the unemployment rate. Later on in the hearing, Congressman Dan Kildee […]

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