Alfred S. Regnery

Alfred S. Regnery is a former publisher of The American Spectator. He is the former president and publisher of Regnery Publishing, Inc., which produced twenty-two New York Times bestsellers during his tenure. Regnery also served in the Justice Department during the Reagan Administration, worked on the U.S. Senate staff, and has been in private law practice.  He currently serves on several corporate and non-profit boards, and is the Chairman of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute .

His first book, Upstream: The Ascendance of American Conservatism, was published in 2008. The book has been praised as one of the best authoritative accounts on the history of the American conservative movement.

Another Obama Friend

 

Remember the fobs? There were reportedly thousands of them, all anxious to do Bill’s bidding, to send an encouraging word or to help minimize the damage when another bimbo or other Clinton scrape erupted. The anointed one doesn’t seem to be so lucky. No FOB lists this time around, just a very small and very […]

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Who’s Really Conservative?

 

Rarely has the debate between right and left been more vibrant than it is as we enter this election year, a year when the very soul of the country is at stake, and will be decided by the November election. The Republican candidates each tell us how they are more conservative than the other guy, […]

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Obama Can’t Get Past the Past

 

Religion and american politics are intertwined in many ways, and there is unending concern, largely among his opponents, that a politician’s religious background will interfere with his judgment, affect his decisions and his appointments, and otherwise get in the way of his exercise of power. Mitt Romney’s critics constantly worry about his Mormonism, the mainstream […]

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My One-Night Stand With a Real Pig

 

Lest readers think that the Spectator is all about serious stuff–politics, terrorists, foreign debt, and health care reform–let me devote my space to advise that we also know how to have a pretty good time, especially at the most politically incorrect party of the year. In order to celebrate Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Red Meat […]

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Balancing Acts

 

“TAX and tax, spend and spend, elect and elect,” Harry Hopkins, FDR’s most trusted adviser, allegedly told Arthur Krock, veteran columnist for the New York Times. Lest we forget, Hopkins lived in the family quarters at the White House and, according to files found inside the Kremlin after the fall of the Workers’ Paradise, was […]

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Red States Rising

 

With the federal government in charge of most everything these days and incessantly trying to gather more into its grasp, it is easy to forget that the states still have quite a role to play. With the election, in 2010, of a crop of new conservative Republican governors and more than 650 conservative Republican state […]

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They’re All in This Together

 

Asked during the 2008 presidential campaign about his relationship with the left-wing radical Bill Ayers, Barack Obama replied that Ayers was just “a guy who lives in my neighborhood.” He implied that to even bring that questionable relationship out of the shadows was a mean-spirited, guilt-by-association political tactic. Ayers, Obama went on, had done something […]

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William A. Rusher, RIP

 

Conservatism has lost its most dedicated eternal optimist. One of the last of the original conservative giants, one who was involved in all of the big battles of the right wing, and one who provided encouragement to all those hapless souls who were often on the verge of giving up. William Rusher, whom our colleague […]

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The Best Is Yet to Come

 

Press reports tell us that Republican activists are convinced that the nation is hurtling down the wrong road, about to lose its place in the world to the Chinese. Weak, feckless, and faithless, burdened by too much debt, the America we grew up knowing is on the skids. As usual, press reports are probably wrong. […]

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We’ll Always Have Paris

 

There are good bureaucracies and there are bad bureaucracies, but they all share at least one thing: Parkinson’s Law. They will expand over time, regardless of the workload. NATO was always a good bureaucracy, at least during the Cold War. Designed to keep the Russians out, the U.S. in, and the Germans down, it served […]

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